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 Posted: Apr 29, 2013 11:16AM
Total posts: 146
Last post: Jul 10, 2014
Member since:Mar 19, 2013

sigh, now that was a full day for me, headliner is in... first and last time i mess around with that... my thought when i bought it was that it was already fitted somewhat maybe i would have to trim it a little but did not understand that it came as a square... that was more of a task to get it fitted and tight and then to get the windows back in over the edges with out fliping them back inwards.. oh and my glue is weak not as strong as i think it needs to be, we shall see. also got my drive flange and cv in so i reassembled the front end, everything went in smooth but my exhause seems to be really close to my iner pot joint almost touching the zip tie that holds the boot on. dont remember it being that close before i removed the engine, i adjusted  the exhaust but still dont have a lot of space. thats all i did tonight but dang that felt like a lot.  got the rear camber brackets in but not sure im going to install them. at least not till im rolling again, the dizzy is still awol. engine is set, timeing gun ready, still no leaks after 4 days, i think im ready.. hope im ready.

 Posted: Apr 28, 2013 01:59PM
Total posts: 7772
Last post: Jul 21, 2014
Member since:Jun 5, 2000

Thanks for the information on the vents.

I agree 100% about the clips.  The only place I remember seeing that style of clip used was to hold seat upholstery in place underneat and inside seats.

Doug L.
 Posted: Apr 28, 2013 07:14AM
Total posts: 4184
Last post: Jul 23, 2014
Member since:Feb 7, 2006

Doug i don't think chrome ones were ever used (never read the fine print just looked at the picture) always wrinkle finish satin black AFAIK.

You won't need those clips after the glue has set up and the seals hold the headliner in place, in fact i would say those clips would tear the headliner when trying to install them if they are the same ones used to hold the finish stips on the outside seams of a Mini. Go with a box of binder clips previously mentioned for the insatall.

If in doubt, flat out . Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

 Posted: Apr 28, 2013 06:56AM
Total posts: 146
Last post: Jul 10, 2014
Member since:Mar 19, 2013

http://minispares.com/product/Classic/Interior/Trim/Headlinings_Sunvisors/C707.aspx?170802&ReturnUrl=/product/Classic/Interior/Trim/Headlinings_Sunvisors/14A8094.aspx|Back to
these are the clips i have coming, i think they are used for what you are saying to use the binder clips for, i think with these i can leave them installed, i may use a few to keep the vinyl tight on the botom of the top rail too.  i have the long crome piece for my botom rail but before i knew how expensive it was i damaged it during the removal of my lower shelf so i am replaceing it and figured i would get two and use the other to hold the top vinyl in place but was worried that the curve was too much and the bend would damage it and prevent it from holding.  i left the wrap long on the top of the bottom and just tucked it up and behind the dash till i get something to fix it tight so it doesnt unwrap.

 Posted: Apr 28, 2013 06:22AM
Total posts: 7772
Last post: Jul 21, 2014
Member since:Jun 5, 2000

What years were chromed demister vents used?  My '64 has always had "black" ones.

The office binder clips mentioned by Malsal work very well.  I used them when putting the headliner in our Spitfire hardtop and when fitting new convertible tops to various cars.  Don't be tempted to just buy large ones.  You will find that a bunch of small clips work well for providing a lot of holding power in the corners and curved areas.

If you vinyl cover the dash rails, don't become upset if you find the wrap for the shelf comes undone on the bottom side.  It seems that no matter how much glue or care is taken with the bottom surface, areas always let go.  Duck tape can help there.  Keep in mind that is on the bottom side and won't be seen unless they are kneeling through the door opening.

Doug L.
 Posted: Apr 28, 2013 06:08AM
Total posts: 4184
Last post: Jul 23, 2014
Member since:Feb 7, 2006

The demister vents are the right ones that they used on the Coopers with the wrapped top rail. I have not used the other piece you showed and have only seen lower rails that this was used on but i have used plastic door edge molding that worked (depending on how thick the material is) and you can buy it in 20 foot rolls from parts stores over here.

If in doubt, flat out . Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

 Posted: Apr 28, 2013 05:12AM
Total posts: 146
Last post: Jul 10, 2014
Member since:Mar 19, 2013

ya after pulling out the headliner i found that what i thought was water damage, was actual glue that blead thru. it looks like all the contact surface is with in 2 inches of the outer boarder. i just finished the wrap on the dash and a frames that was a pain but looks really good, has anyone ever used the
http://www.minimania.com/part/14A8009/Chome-Strip-Lower-Dash-Mki--Mkii-Mini-Cooper on the top part of the dash under the ash tray to hold the vinyl wrap tight? this is what my dash looks like without the wrap, just bare metal

ill get a photo of the dash with the wrap, but this should show what type dash i have. and are these the right vent covers?http://www.minimania.com/part/14A9949CHROME/Demister-Air-Vent-Chrome---Mini--Mini-Cooper-S 

 Posted: Apr 28, 2013 04:58AM
Total posts: 4184
Last post: Jul 23, 2014
Member since:Feb 7, 2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by 82mini

when i pulled it out it seemed to be under high stress everywhere actual has me worried about reinstalling it.

Installing a headliner in a Mini is not the easiest job and requires a lot of patience and is best done with two people. I use the clips that you get from office supply stores binder clips i think and be careful to only use enough glue in the adhearing areas as the glue stains will seep through with age and look like water damage.

Also have a hair dryer or heat gun handy to pull out the wrinkles but be careful and use low heat it doesnt take much to ruin it, just take your time and be patient it is not a job that can be rushed.

If in doubt, flat out . Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

 Posted: Apr 27, 2013 09:48PM
Total posts: 146
Last post: Jul 10, 2014
Member since:Mar 19, 2013

when i pulled it out it seemed to be under high stress everywhere actual has me worried about reinstalling it.

 Posted: Apr 27, 2013 12:13PM
Total posts: 7772
Last post: Jul 21, 2014
Member since:Jun 5, 2000

There are several grades of 3M spray adhesive.  Spray 80 is specifically for vinyl while 90 is high-strength.  I would use one of those two in preference to 77.  However, you can also use regular brush-on contact adhesive.  There are a few places where the vinyl may be under a bit higher stress and regular contact adhesive tends to work better in those areas than spray.  However, as I mentioned earlier, my Mini headliner is different than yours so my experience with gluing them in is with other non-Mini cars.  I cannot tell you the high-stress areas on a Mini headliner. 

Doug L.
 Posted: Apr 27, 2013 09:16AM
Total posts: 146
Last post: Jul 10, 2014
Member since:Mar 19, 2013


parts didnt show up on friday so i started with tear down, windows out, found some rust but everything is solid, just surface rust.  i tented the rear and sides while they where out and cleaned everything.  removed the headliner and now im waiting till monday for the rubbers and tool to finish the job.  the glue for the headliner, do you use the same glue you use for the carpets the 3m spray on glue or is there something else?  my wife looked at me crazy when i told her i needed the ky for my mini heehee.  i got some germany undercoat silicone stuff that dosnet fully dry so i think its simialure to what was mentioned above i spread that on the surface rust and ill reapply some more when i get the rubbers. i too am going to add wrap the dash and a frames so ill be sure to trim it up before install thanks steve. my drive flange and outer cv should be here monday as well, im excited to see if i fixed all my leaks in the last two weeks while my engine was out and test out the solid frame kit i installed. thats if my dizzy makes it here on monday. i set up the engine on tdc and installed a smiths rpm gauge so i can time it up nicely. while the carpet was out i put in some dyno mat to try and cut the sound down some. i should be back on the road next weekend if i dont find any more problems while hooking all this back up.

 Posted: Apr 25, 2013 04:03AM
Total posts: 2244
Last post: Jul 21, 2014
Member since:Oct 8, 2011
US


I install front and rear screens by myself and have had no problems. I can't say the same about fixed side windows. I wrecked the rubber removing a set. Some time back I bought a set of fixed gaskets and glass thinking I'd use the glass for a templet and cut plexi for a race car. The weight of the gaskets surprised me and I won't be doing that. I now have two sets of glass and one set of gaskets.

I know this is going to sound crazy but when I installed my last front we had wrapped the dash rail and A pillars. The interior guy did the head liner and the dash. He folded the material over the edge of the opening all the way round. I could not get the screen to pop in place. I removed the rubber and trimed the material all the way round (no over lap) and the screem went right in. Steve (CTR)

 Posted: Apr 24, 2013 04:37PM
Total posts: 7772
Last post: Jul 21, 2014
Member since:Jun 5, 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by 82mini

 the side windows go in the same way? cause they dont have a lock strip, is it pretty much the same proccess? 

My Mini has opening side windows so it uses different seals.  The only car where I have installed fixed side windows was on our old VW Rabbit.  

Where there is no lock-strip I think you pretty much have to use the string/rope method.  You CAN install a Mini's front and rear glass by yourself but I would NOT try putting in side glass without a patient, strong helper.  Assuming the Mini side windows are similar to the Rabbit's, you need to use a fairly heavy braided nylon cord 5/32" to 3/16" in diameter.  Don't try string as it will only cut your hands and the vinyl wrapped over the body opening.  Braided cord will work better than twisted rope due to its smoother surface and since it won't want to unwind.  

Fit the glass to the seal then wrap the cord all the way around the seal perimeter overlapping by about 1/2 the length at the bottom.  Have your helper rest the glass/seal/cord assembly on the bottom of the body opening making sure the cords pass through to the inside of the car.  Lube the rubber seal and body opening with K-Y Jelly.  Wear leather gloves and from inside the car pull one end of the cord into the car's interior while holding onto the other cord end so it doesn't slip.  Alternate pulling between the cord ends as the rubber climbs up over the body opening and into the car's interior.  During this process have your assistant apply constant, even downward and inward pressure against the glass.  Work slowly alternating between which end of the cord you are pulling.  Have a plastic putty knife handy to work the rubber over the body opening any place that has difficulty.  

 

Doug L.
 Posted: Apr 24, 2013 12:26PM
Total posts: 7772
Last post: Jul 21, 2014
Member since:Jun 5, 2000


... Or gentle scrubing with a cotton shop towel soaked in mineral spirits, kerosene or diesel.  Take your time and work slowly and gently so you don't damage the paint. 

I stopped using the black goo after using it on a freshly painted white car where it discolored the paint around the window seal.

Doug L.
 Posted: Apr 24, 2013 11:07AM
mur
Total posts: 5053
Last post: Jul 23, 2014
Member since:Nov 12, 1999

Try 3M Specialty Adhesive remover.

 Posted: Apr 24, 2013 09:14AM
Total posts: 1511
Last post: Oct 6, 2013
Member since:Dec 4, 2001
US
Quote:
Originally Posted by dklawson


I have not worked with the later headliners so I can offer no installation comments regarding it.  However, the headliner can be cleaned and re-colored using spray vinyl dye.  I have had very good luck with products from SEM.  Your local paint supplier may have it.  Eastwood and TCP Global (online) both sold SEM the last time I needed some.

You are correct, fit the glass to the body opening first.  Tape it in place making sure that if you fit a continuous length seal (a opposed to close loop molded) that you butt the ends against each other firmly.  (Cut the seal long and push then ends together.  The seal will shrink over time).

Rest the glass in the bottom of the rubber seal, lean it forward and use a plastic spatula or plastic putty knife to lever the rubber up over the seal as you press the glass into/against the body opening.  Generally this does not require any lube but K-Y Jelly works well if you need to get the rubber to slide over the glass.

Buy the lock-strip tool.  You can make your own if you don't have the budget to buy the tool.  However, do not try to put the lock strip in with a screwdriver or similar.  While it can be done that way, you risk hurting yourself or the car if you use a screwdriver.  Run the lock-strip all the way around the seal and when you get back to the starting point, cut the lock-strip long (like the bulk rubber seal if used).  Put the finishing clip on first, then finish pushing the locks-strip in place.  Slide the finisher clip over the lock-strip butt joint.  As with fitting the rubber to the glass, K-Y Jelly works well for easing the lock-strip in place.

It should go without saying that the bodywork needs to be rust free and in good shape if you expect this to seal.  Use new rubber, not an old hard seal.  If you doubt the ability of the rubber to seal against the bodywork or glass, you can use the black sealing goo for glass but I don't use that anymore.  At the parts store look for Permatex flowable windshield sealant.  It is a very soft, thin, free-flowing RTV sealant.  It can wick into tiny cracks to seal voids.  It remains pliable, is easier to remove than regular RTV, and is much cleaner/easier to work with than the black goo.  If you are convinced (in advance) that you need sealant, you can apply it under the edge of the seal to the bodywork and between the glass and rubber before you fit the lock-strip.  When the lock-strip is fitted the excess Permatex will squirt out and you can wipe it away with paper towels.

Any tips for removing the black goo? Ive got it around my windshield seal and sometimes I can rub it off but for the most part it is really stuck on the paint.

"Sorry, Jedi mind tricks don't work on retards"-Retarded Policeman mediocre films
 Posted: Apr 24, 2013 08:57AM
Total posts: 146
Last post: Jul 10, 2014
Member since:Mar 19, 2013

great information on the windows man, i ordered the tool with the rubber its all new.  the side windows go in the same way? cause they dont have a lock strip, is it pretty much the same proccess? i have the rear windows that dont open. the new headliner is already on its way but ill probly paint the old one and resell great info again its the info i need to figure this out. i got the window rubber cause the old is leaking a little and i thought since i was going to do the headliner it would be a good time to change it.

 Posted: Apr 24, 2013 08:26AM
Total posts: 7772
Last post: Jul 21, 2014
Member since:Jun 5, 2000


I have not worked with the later headliners so I can offer no installation comments regarding it.  However, the headliner can be cleaned and re-colored using spray vinyl dye.  I have had very good luck with products from SEM.  Your local paint supplier may have it.  Eastwood and TCP Global (online) both sold SEM the last time I needed some.

You are correct, fit the glass to the body opening first.  Tape it in place making sure that if you fit a continuous length seal (a opposed to close loop molded) that you butt the ends against each other firmly.  (Cut the seal long and push then ends together.  The seal will shrink over time).

Rest the glass in the bottom of the rubber seal, lean it forward and use a plastic spatula or plastic putty knife to lever the rubber up over the seal as you press the glass into/against the body opening.  Generally this does not require any lube but K-Y Jelly works well if you need to get the rubber to slide over the glass.

Buy the lock-strip tool.  You can make your own if you don't have the budget to buy the tool.  However, do not try to put the lock strip in with a screwdriver or similar.  While it can be done that way, you risk hurting yourself or the car if you use a screwdriver.  Run the lock-strip all the way around the seal and when you get back to the starting point, cut the lock-strip long (like the bulk rubber seal if used).  Put the finishing clip on first, then finish pushing the locks-strip in place.  Slide the finisher clip over the lock-strip butt joint.  As with fitting the rubber to the glass, K-Y Jelly works well for easing the lock-strip in place.

It should go without saying that the bodywork needs to be rust free and in good shape if you expect this to seal.  Use new rubber, not an old hard seal.  If you doubt the ability of the rubber to seal against the bodywork or glass, you can use the black sealing goo for glass but I don't use that anymore.  At the parts store look for Permatex flowable windshield sealant.  It is a very soft, thin, free-flowing RTV sealant.  It can wick into tiny cracks to seal voids.  It remains pliable, is easier to remove than regular RTV, and is much cleaner/easier to work with than the black goo.  If you are convinced (in advance) that you need sealant, you can apply it under the edge of the seal to the bodywork and between the glass and rubber before you fit the lock-strip.  When the lock-strip is fitted the excess Permatex will squirt out and you can wipe it away with paper towels.

Doug L.
 Posted: Apr 24, 2013 08:11AM
Total posts: 146
Last post: Jul 10, 2014
Member since:Mar 19, 2013

ok headliner and window rubbers should be here tomorrow with the new dizzy and drive flange and outer cv... so i have a full weekend... i havent ever done a head linner and its been 20 years since i replaced glass.  last car i replaced glass on was a 66 barracuda which we used the string method but from what i have read you dont do that with these cars. im to put the rubber in first then the glass, any tips for this would be useful. as well as the head liner i ordered a pack of clips to go with it and there is nothing wrong or missing with the current headliner i just want to go black instead of white, well there is some water staining on it near the windshield. so any pointers on the headliner and window install would be much appriciated. thanks in advance
Don