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 Posted: Jun 8, 2017 02:58PM
Total posts: 82
Last post: Jun 20, 2017
Member since:Sep 20, 2012
Ok so i did a little closer inspection and found that i forgot to replace one of the gaskets between the carb and the spacer. Oops. So now it runs but only at a very rough idle and there is absolutely no throttle response. I took off the cap and the points look new. I will admit I did not get a chance to look through the links today though.

 Posted: Jun 8, 2017 01:07PM
Total posts: 7098
Last post: Jun 23, 2017
Member since:Aug 14, 2002
CA
Doug's suggestions about cleaning the points is excellent. I was taught to remove the points and take them to a (clean) bench to work on. I was taught to open the points and inspect each face separately, file off any protrusions and make them very VERY slightly convex - they could be flattened or concave (cupped) and shouldn't be. Then the next step was to polish them with crocus paper, an extremely fine abrasive paper, until they were mirror-smooth. Lastly, close the points and make sure the two faces line up perfectly.

Coolant spraying out the tailpipe? Are you sure it wasn't just condensation or rain/wash water? Fuels produce carbon dioxide and water (and other nastier stuff). When you start a car, the exhaust pipe and muffler are cold and the water from combustion cools and condenses. The exhaust flow will push drops of water out the tailpipe and on a cold day you will see condensed water vapour (steam).

Coolant out the overflow tube? If the rad was filled to the neck before putting the cap on and starting it, the coolant has nowhere else to go as it expands. The top tank of the rad should only be about half-full, leaving air space for expansion. That's about 1/2 to 1 inch over the core tubes. Any more and expansion pushes the excess out. when the engine cools, the rad cap is vented to let air back in, preventing the rad from collapsing.

Back in your first post, you said the engine runs until you push the choke in. That still points to a massive air leak in the intake system, probably a result of not getting the manifold back on properly. If you have an original cast iron combination intake/exhaust manifold, it needs to be reinstalled with the exhaust pipe disconnected. Check also the carb connections - most common SU carbs have a port for the crankcase ventilation that needs to be either properly reconnected or capped off.

You are on a steep learning curve about Minis but seem to be handling it well.


.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Jun 8, 2017 11:12AM
Total posts: 82
Last post: Jun 20, 2017
Member since:Sep 20, 2012

Thanks for that info Dan and DK. I'M going to read through all of it now. As far as fitting new points, I have no reservations about doing that. The parts are so cheap.

 

I changed the head gasket because I noticed coolant spraying out the exhaust while it was warming up last week. I also noticed a lot of coolant came out of the overflow tube after the first drive. I just bought the car a month ago too. I've put maybe 20 miles on it. Probably less.

 Posted: Jun 8, 2017 10:27AM
Total posts: 8429
Last post: Jun 23, 2017
Member since:Jun 5, 2000
US
Harvey makes a good point.  Why did you have to work on the head?

Since you said you have not set points before and Dan said the video could be better, I suggest looking at the webpage linked below.
https://www.howacarworks.com/ignition-system/fitting-and-adjusting-contact-breaker-points

I have also found that the ignition system article on "How Stuff Works" is very helpful in building an understanding of what you are doing when you make adjustments.  Take a look at the webpage below and be sure to click "NEXT" to move through the subsequent pages.  The animations and text are very helpful.
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/ignition-system.htm

The point article linked above will walk you through points adjustment.  HOWEVER, there is one area that Dan mentioned that the article does not cover well... cleaning points.

During normal operation, material is transferred to/on/around the contact faces of the points forming mounds of material.  Prior to setting the points with feeler gauges you need to remove those mounds.  They used to sell points files to remove the high-spots.  I haven't seen them in years.  What you are NOT supposed to do is use wet/dry sandpaper to dress them flat.  However, that is exactly what I do.  The argument against pulling strips of wet/dry paper through the points is that bits of grit may come off the paper, stick to the points faces, and hold the contacts apart.  I have never seen that happen.  I think points are a lot harder than they were "back in the day".  I know whenever I tried a thread file on new points they barely touched the surface.  If in doubt, fit new points.  Regardless, don't try setting the points gap until you know their contact surfaces are  clean and flat.

Doug L.
 Posted: Jun 8, 2017 04:27AM
Total posts: 7098
Last post: Jun 23, 2017
Member since:Aug 14, 2002
CA
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrewM
Ok I can do that. I've never done this before. Is this video a good explanation or is there more to it?
Not a very good video - it only shows how to adjust the gap of the points, and not very well. But it does show that you need the cam to fully open the points to do the measurement. You also need to check the condition of the point faces. Chances are if they are not reasonably new, they will be pitted or "toothed" - metal transfer from one to the other - by the sparking. One also needs to check that the condenser is good, that all the wires both inside and outside the distributor are good and well connected and that everything is clean. I have never seen the insides of a distributor look so dirty as the one in the video. It looks like it has been submerged for some time. You also need to check the distributor cap and rotor. Then check the spark plugs and wires. When all is right, you need to check the spark timing.

It seems like a lot, but you can learn to do it. The process is very similar for any car with a points type ignition system.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Jun 7, 2017 01:12PM
Total posts: 1816
Last post: Jun 20, 2017
Member since:Aug 29, 2001
first things first - what prompted the need to replace the head gasket?

 Posted: Jun 7, 2017 12:22PM
Total posts: 82
Last post: Jun 20, 2017
Member since:Sep 20, 2012
Ok I can do that. I've never done this before. Is this video a good explanation or is there more to it?

 Posted: Jun 7, 2017 12:06PM
Total posts: 8429
Last post: Jun 23, 2017
Member since:Jun 5, 2000
US
Though this all started after working on the head, don't forget to check the ignition.  Be sure to make a quick inspection of the points to insure that they are opening.  When the points gap is near its limit, you can have a car that will start and run for a while when cold but be almost impossible to restart when hot.  It's a quick thing to check and once you have excluded it you can move on to fuel and vacuum leaks.

Doug L.
 Posted: Jun 7, 2017 10:46AM
Total posts: 82
Last post: Jun 20, 2017
Member since:Sep 20, 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willie_B
Sounds like a vacuum leak. Runs rich with the choke but not enough fuel with the choke off. Check manifold & carb gaskets.
Ok I'll check all the gaskets. Would that explain why it will run fine at first but not refire with or without choke though? It seems strange to me that it will run fine at first, but I'm willing to accept it if it fixes the issue.

 Posted: Jun 7, 2017 10:04AM
Total posts: 2058
Last post: Jun 9, 2017
Member since:Dec 1, 2002
Sounds like a vacuum leak. Runs rich with the choke but not enough fuel with the choke off. Check manifold & carb gaskets.

"How can anything bigger be mini?"

 Posted: Jun 7, 2017 09:08AM
Total posts: 287
Last post: Jun 7, 2017
Member since:Nov 1, 2012
Gas and Spark AT plugs and coil to the Head

 Posted: Jun 7, 2017 08:45AM
Total posts: 82
Last post: Jun 20, 2017
Member since:Sep 20, 2012
I replaced the head gasket this weekend. Everything went back together ok. The engine started fine and ran for a minute or two until I pushed in the choke and it died a few seconds later. I then couldn't get it refired, with or without the choke. I tired it with the choke the next day and it fired on the first try. Same thing. Push in the choke and it died and won't refire. It just turns over and sounds like it isn't getting any fuel. I believe the carb is an HS4. I took off the dashpot & piston/needle and cleaned it but still nothing. Carbs are not my area of expertise so I'm not sure how to solve this problem. The frustrating part is that the engine would easily start up with or without the choke before I replaced the head gasket. 

Has anyone ran into this issue or have any ideas?

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