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 Posted: May 17, 2018 10:32AM
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CA
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1963SV2
Quote:
...
Maybe they put stuff in fuel used in colder climates but I must admit its something I've never (sic) worried about with my Minis..

Cheers, Ian
The unleaded fuels we get in North America tend to go sour after a month or two, making starting of Mini engines and small engines such as on snowblowers, lawnmowers etc. gradually more difficult. Easier to drain small engines and run them dry. To store gasoline for any length of time, especially in a fuel tank, one needs to add a stabilizer, which helps keep the fuel much longer. Modern cars with electronic  fuel injection and spark are more tolerant.
In Canada, we have summer gas and winter gas. The winter gas has a different set of additives that do I'm not really sure. The only thing a typical driver sees is the prices jump up due to a "shortage" in the production cycle when the refineries switch from winter to summer. Something we have to put up with, like road salt and potholes.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: May 16, 2018 07:02PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whee
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Moffet
Quote:
Originally Posted by dklawson
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Moffet
Since I have a HIF44 installed, it is not possible to completely drain it dry and I doubt HS types would be much better. 
In the past when I have wanted to store a car with dry carbs I have had the good fortune that the car had an electric fuel pump.  With the power to the pump disconnected you just need to idle the car for a few minutes until it runs out of gas.
I hadn't thought of that, though with my luck, I'd probably forget to reconnect it in the spring! An electric pump sure helps fill a carb to get it started again - just turn on the ignition and wait before cranking the engine. If the tank is full, the carbs will likely be re-primed by gravity, though it may depend on the type of electric pump installed.
Been there, done that.
Have you checked that the carb is actually empty (dry)??  I would have thought that the float level would fall as fuel is used without being replaced until the idle went so lean that it cut out...  I wouldn't have thought that the engine would suck ALL of the fuel out of the float chamber...

When I put my car in long term storage I just filled the tank, changed the oil, removed the battery and put some wooden blocks under the suspension.  Four years later I put in a new battery, gave the recalcitrant electric fuel pump a bang with my shoe.   It started, we checked the brakes and drove off to get new rego documents.  A few weeks later I did change the brake fluid but that was more of a precaution than anything.  

Maybe they put stuff in fuel used in colder climates but I must admit its something I've never (sic) worried about with my Minis..

Cheers, Ian

 Posted: May 16, 2018 06:01PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Moffet
Quote:
Originally Posted by dklawson
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Moffet
Since I have a HIF44 installed, it is not possible to completely drain it dry and I doubt HS types would be much better. 
In the past when I have wanted to store a car with dry carbs I have had the good fortune that the car had an electric fuel pump.  With the power to the pump disconnected you just need to idle the car for a few minutes until it runs out of gas.
I hadn't thought of that, though with my luck, I'd probably forget to reconnect it in the spring! An electric pump sure helps fill a carb to get it started again - just turn on the ignition and wait before cranking the engine. If the tank is full, the carbs will likely be re-primed by gravity, though it may depend on the type of electric pump installed.
Been there, done that.

 Posted: May 16, 2018 11:36AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottwkurth
Thanks for all the information; this was really helpful.

I have a few follow-up questions.

I did not realize that the second pipe on the right-hand carb was an overflow pipe. I was looking at pictures from google image search to try to figure out how I should try to route everything. If that is an overflow pipe, how does this setup even work?


Or is it the difference between these two lids?



---------------

If I relocate the fuel filter to under the boot, does it matter if I locate it upstream or downstream of the fuel pump? Also, should I switch to a metal filter since this one is glass and it will be exposed to the road?

Thanks!
Scott
The correct lid to use is the AUD 272 (out of stock) if you use the correct copper pipe. As i said you can use your existing lid if you clock it so the inlet faces the radiator. To use either of these set ups you need the copper pipe or a Tee connection. You could use the bottom lid picture you posted as long as you can clock it to where the fuel lines will not foul anything.
The overflow piped lids were used mainly on other Brit cars, the Mini still has an overflow system under the metal tab there is a breather hole.

Metal filters are good but on a low pressure system i prefer a clear plastic one so that you can see the condition of the filter.
I am sure the glass filter would be ok you could even re route the fuel line and mount it in the trunk if you wanted to or just keep it up front with a shorter filter.

If in doubt, flat out . Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

 Posted: May 16, 2018 09:22AM
 Edited:  May 16, 2018 09:24AM
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CA
Quote:
Originally Posted by dklawson
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Moffet
Since I have a HIF44 installed, it is not possible to completely drain it dry and I doubt HS types would be much better. 
In the past when I have wanted to store a car with dry carbs I have had the good fortune that the car had an electric fuel pump.  With the power to the pump disconnected you just need to idle the car for a few minutes until it runs out of gas.
I hadn't thought of that, though with my luck, I'd probably forget to reconnect it in the spring! An electric pump sure helps fill a carb to get it started again - just turn on the ignition and wait before cranking the engine. If the tank is full, the carbs will likely be re-primed by gravity, though it may depend on the type of electric pump installed.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: May 16, 2018 08:21AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Moffet
Since I have a HIF44 installed, it is not possible to completely drain it dry and I doubt HS types would be much better. 
In the past when I have wanted to store a car with dry carbs I have had the good fortune that the car had an electric fuel pump.  With the power to the pump disconnected you just need to idle the car for a few minutes until it runs out of gas.

Doug L.
 Posted: May 16, 2018 05:36AM
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CA
Since my Mini's fuel tank has been treated with POR 15, I'm not worried about it rusting. I run the tank down to about half-full and add stabilizer, then run the engine until I'm sure the stabilizer has made it to the carb. Then I treat the engine for storage.
That way, I have no worries about fuel flowing into the crankcase. My preference is to keep the carb wet so the inlet needle doesn't stick. Since I have a HIF44 installed, it is not possible to completely drain it dry and I doubt HS types would be much better. The small bit of residue might cause gumminess. On the other hand, I wonder if the carb dries out anyway over several months.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: May 15, 2018 06:25PM
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Thank you Dan, makes sense. Thinking of adding a fuel shut off valve to prevent the possibility of the problem, also I like the idea of running the fuel out of the carbs for winter storage, and keeping a full gas tank.

 Posted: May 15, 2018 04:57PM
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Thanks for all the information; this was really helpful.

I have a few follow-up questions.

I did not realize that the second pipe on the right-hand carb was an overflow pipe. I was looking at pictures from google image search to try to figure out how I should try to route everything. If that is an overflow pipe, how does this setup even work?


Or is it the difference between these two lids?



---------------

If I relocate the fuel filter to under the boot, does it matter if I locate it upstream or downstream of the fuel pump? Also, should I switch to a metal filter since this one is glass and it will be exposed to the road?

Thanks!
Scott

-------------------------------------------------------------
Scott | 1963 Austin Cooper | 2003 MINI Cooper S
 Posted: May 15, 2018 03:10PM
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Looking at your original pic the front lid you have will work you just need to clock it until the main line points towards the radiator. If you want the correct lid just order the same one without the overflow tube, you will need the copper line and move the fuel filter to make this work though.

If in doubt, flat out . Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

 Posted: May 15, 2018 12:22PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onetim
...

A separate question, will the over flow tubes prevent the crank case filling over the winter with full tank storage in the case of a leaking seat, or stuck, sinking float?
The float level, when set correctly, provides fuel in the main jet very near the top of the jet, just below the bridge in the carb throat. If the float fails open, the fuel level in the carb bowl will be higher than the top of the bridge, and fuel will flow out of the jet and down into the engine. If your fuel tank is low, it may only drain the bowl, but if the fuel level in the tank is higher than the carb, it will continue to flow by gravity until the level drops.  I'm not absolutely sure about a HS2, but HS4 and HIF carbs have their overflow ports well above the bridge level, so you won't see fuel coming out them. The only time you'd see fuel coming out the vent/overflow is when the fuel pump is operating.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: May 15, 2018 08:18AM
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Working on mine, before seeking expert advice here, I purchased the correct mini fuel line and also found it unusable for my set up. I have 3 lines on the left float lid and 2 on the right. they are feed to the left (in) out to the right, and over flow the other is feed to the right and overflow. I invented a kind of W or M shaped stainless crossover line for proper stub hose connections, and to clear the Carb linkage, that also bolts to the heat deflector.

A separate question, will the over flow tubes prevent the crank case filling over the winter with full tank storage in the case of a leaking seat, or stuck, sinking float?

 Posted: May 15, 2018 08:04AM
 Edited:  May 15, 2018 03:06PM
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Your front carb should have something like an AUE 268 or AUE 269  float lid which has the correct in and out line connections. The one you have is a single line set up with an overflow fitting (not an output line).
You could use a much smaller filter than the one you have or re locate it under the boot floor as Steve said.

You could switch things around and feed the rear carb first that would allow you to fit the fuel filter in the rear of the carbs, might look a bit messy though.

As Doug said you need the brass tube to connect the fuel line it also has two clamps to attach it to the upper carb mounting bolts.

5/16" coarse sounds correct for the bolts.

Edit: I just looked at two sets of 1.25" S carbs on manifolds and both of them had single line feeds. These you would use with the correct copper line.
I tried to look on the SU site to give you a number but it won't load at the moment but the front lid should have the T shape connector with the feed exiting at the bottom of the T between two of the screw holes used to mount it if that makes any sense. This will give you the correct orientation for the fuel line and copper line.

If in doubt, flat out . Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

 Posted: May 15, 2018 07:45AM
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The factory dual carb setup would have used a T-pipe instead of a T-fitting.  See our host's part #12G292 for the factory pipe. 

I could not find a good picture of that pipe installed but take a look at the image linked below.



You will see the pipe run along the bottom of the picture.  It turns up and to the left just off the image.  Note how the front bowl lid is oriented so the bowl lid brass pipe is pointing down and to the right.  Short bits of rubber fuel hose join the T-pipe to the bowl lids.  As Steve said, it's difficult to connect an engine bay mounted fuel filter to the T-pipe.

The second brass tube on the front float bowl lid is probably an overflow vent.  Confirm this is the case and use a length of fuel hose to direct any overflow back to the firewall then downward so no fuel can splash on the exhaust.

Doug L.
 Posted: May 15, 2018 03:47AM
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Thank you for filling out your profile. Don't know who rebuilt your carbs. It would be nice to get your parts back. I would suggest you locate that fuel filter at the rear under the boot. There is more room to work with back there. The normal hook up between carbs would be a tube forming a Tee if you like with a long part going to your right carb a short tube going to your left carb and the long tube going on toward the area where you have your filter. That should be connect to the supply line via a short length of fuel line. I'm going to go out on a limb and suggest the extra tube coming from the lid that was not yours is a bowl over flow off a MGB which would get a line to direct over in case of a stuck open float valve away from hot exhaust manifold. I must have a hundred float bowl lids. I'd say the bolts that hold the air horns on are 5/16 course. Hope that helps. Steve (CTR)

 Posted: May 14, 2018 07:42PM
 Edited:  May 14, 2018 07:43PM
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I just got a new intake manifold and had my carbs rebuilt as part of undoing some of the kluges from a previous owner. I need help with a few different things as I’m trying to get everything back in working order.

  1.  
  2. 1. One of the carbs came back from the rebuild with a different float lid. I used to have one connection per float and the fuel line ran from the filter into a T and then to each carb. I do want to get rid of the T in the fuel hoses, but I feel like the float lid that they installed must be for a RHD car. No matter which orientation I rotate it, it leaves fuel lines running at impossible angles. I have been looking at all the options on the SU site here, but I'm not sure what the right solution is. What float lids would be correct for dual HS2 carbs on a LHD car?

  3. 2. The other issue I’m struggling with is I can’t figure out how I can possibly connect the output of the fuel filter to the float lid nearest it. You can see the filter on the right of the attached image. What am I doing wrong? I can’t see any way that I can make the connection without some crazy bends in the hose. Should the lid with the two connectors go on the far carb instead? Is this why they used a T? Is there a better / more compact filter I should be using?

  4. 3. Finally, the bolts for mounting my air filters got lost somewhere along the way and didn't come back with the carbs. What is the proper size for the bolts that connect to the flange on the carbs?

Thanks!
Scott

-------------------------------------------------------------
Scott | 1963 Austin Cooper | 2003 MINI Cooper S