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 Posted: Jul 16, 2018 05:59AM
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Especially on a single circuit system.

If in doubt, flat out. Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

Give a car more power and it goes faster on the straights,
make a car lighter and it's faster everywhere. Colin Chapman.

 Posted: Jul 16, 2018 05:13AM
 Edited:  Jul 16, 2018 05:14AM
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CA
The phrase "tothefloor" takes on a whole different meaning when talking about brakes. Just sayin'.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Jul 15, 2018 09:43AM
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 Well I guess I plug them right with left front before right front. Even after I asked a question. So since I had the stroke have a hard time figuring some of the stuff out. But I did go left front before right front No wonder takes me twice as long to get stuff done

 Posted: Jul 15, 2018 09:28AM
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I wouldn't sweat it, but if you do bleed them again, bleed the RF last, as that's the one which has the shortest length of brake line.

 Posted: Jul 15, 2018 08:47AM
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@&$.  I was driving the other night and the brakes went to the floor. Well I guess I had brakes the last quarter inch of travel. Came home and looked in the brake cylinder and it was halfway down. I know the brake fluid shouldn’t go anywhere but it had been about 3 to 5 years since I checked it.  I bled the brakes once went for a drive everything seemed fine. So I blead them again. Now I look at the car and realize that I blesses  the left front before I bled the right front I think both times. I’m going out for a drive right now and I’m wondering if I need to bleed the system again or if I can just bleadp
d the front half or just leave it alone because I have  top of the travel brakes??  

 Posted: Jul 13, 2018 08:01PM
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US
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Moffet
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohninCM
Sorta on topic. I recently picked up an "Allstar Performance ALL11017 Bleeder Bottle with Magnet and Check Valve" from Amazon. This thing is great for one person brake bleeding. The secret is the one way fluid check valve built into the outgoing fluid line. Anyhow hook this up to the bleed nipple, crack the bleeder, pump the pedal a few times and done. Just make sure to not let the master cylinder run dry.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00F9XHVKA/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

John
I used a cheapie version of that - mine doesn't have the check valve. I did like the magnet idea though. I stuck it to the jack stand just below the bleeder level and watched it as it gravity bled. Mine was small enough that I'd have to empty it before I'd drain the maser cylinder too low. It is stuck to the side of the toolbox now. The magnet is also handy for storing it.
Funny stuff ... mine is stuck to the side of my toolbox as well.

When bleeding my 2013 Ford Focus, gravity took over on the front calipers also. The rears required some leg work.

 Posted: Jul 13, 2018 07:20AM
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CA
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohninCM
Sorta on topic. I recently picked up an "Allstar Performance ALL11017 Bleeder Bottle with Magnet and Check Valve" from Amazon. This thing is great for one person brake bleeding. The secret is the one way fluid check valve built into the outgoing fluid line. Anyhow hook this up to the bleed nipple, crack the bleeder, pump the pedal a few times and done. Just make sure to not let the master cylinder run dry.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00F9XHVKA/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

John
I used a cheapie version of that - mine doesn't have the check valve. I did like the magnet idea though. I stuck it to the jack stand just below the bleeder level and watched it as it gravity bled. Mine was small enough that I'd have to empty it before I'd drain the maser cylinder too low. It is stuck to the side of the toolbox now. The magnet is also handy for storing it.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Jul 12, 2018 08:17PM
 Edited:  Jul 12, 2018 08:18PM
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US
Sorta on topic. I recently picked up an "Allstar Performance ALL11017 Bleeder Bottle with Magnet and Check Valve" from Amazon. This thing is great for one person brake bleeding. The secret is the one way fluid check valve built into the outgoing fluid line. Anyhow hook this up to the bleed nipple, crack the bleeder, pump the pedal a few times and done. Just make sure to not let the master cylinder run dry.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00F9XHVKA/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

John

 Posted: Jul 12, 2018 03:29PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scargo
Malcolm ... The sequence that I indicated is based upon the length of brake line from the master cylinder to the wheels on a single line LHD car. I do not understand why that would change between LHD and RHD since the routing past the 3-way connector is the same for both. The only thing that changes between the two is the RHD car has a shorter brake line between the master and the 3-way. Please help me understand your statement.
Good point Howard i really had not thought of the line lengths just going by LH or RH drive.
As you pointed out the only difference is the length of the line from the master to the 3 way so wouldn't that come into play as the fluid/pressure has farther ( although only 3 feet or so ) to travel on a LHD car compared to a RHD car? If the length of the line did not matter you could bleed whichever wheel you wanted in whatever order you wanted.

I would bleed a RHD car LR, RR, LF, RF.
I would bleed a LHD car RR, LR, RF, LF.

Also the diagonal split braking systems are a different beast as you bleed them totally different to the norm.

To add some confusion i just found a reference in Haynes 69 through 93.

Single circuit brakes: RHD car LF, RF, LR, RR.     LHD car RF, LF, LR, RR.

Early dual circuit system: RHD car RR, LR, LF, RF.     LHD car LR, RR, RF, LF.

Diagonal split dual circuit system with inbuilt pressure differential warning actuator: RHD car RR, LF, LR, RF.    LHD car LR, RF, RR, LF.

Front to rear split dual circuit system with inbuilt pressure differential warning actuator: RHD car LR, RR' LF, RF. LHD car same as RHD car.

According to that myself and you Howard and a lot of other Mini owners for that matter have been doing it wrong all these years LOL. On regular systems i have always bled from the farthest point away from the master cylinder first whether LHD or RHD with no issues.
Some cars bleed easily others i have had to crack every connection loose but from the front to the rear if there is some stubborn air in the system.

Don't shoot me i am only the messenger.


If in doubt, flat out. Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

Give a car more power and it goes faster on the straights,
make a car lighter and it's faster everywhere. Colin Chapman.

 Posted: Jul 12, 2018 02:19PM
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US
Yes, LHD and RHD are the same and are as indicated starting with the LR.

 Posted: Jul 12, 2018 12:43PM
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CA
I concur with Howard's analysis. I think the real question is how many times before all the air is out. I imagine the answer is "one more time".

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Jul 12, 2018 10:55AM
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Malcolm ... The sequence that I indicated is based upon the length of brake line from the master cylinder to the wheels on a single line LHD car. I do not understand why that would change between LHD and RHD since the routing past the 3-way connector is the same for both. The only thing that changes between the two is the RHD car has a shorter brake line between the master and the 3-way. Please help me understand your statement.

 Posted: Jul 12, 2018 08:05AM
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Scargo's post is for a RHD car.

If in doubt, flat out. Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

Give a car more power and it goes faster on the straights,
make a car lighter and it's faster everywhere. Colin Chapman.

 Posted: Jul 12, 2018 02:16AM
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Furthest to nearest : LR, RR, LF, RF.

 Posted: Jul 11, 2018 11:24PM
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Depends whether L or RHD..

Start furthest from master col.  For LHD; right rear, left rear, right front, left front.  

Cheers, Ian

 Posted: Jul 11, 2018 10:01PM
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 Could somebody please tell me the  brake bleeding sequence on a 64 Morris cooper. Is it left front, right front, right rear, left rear??