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 Posted: May 17, 2019 04:38AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coolingthunder
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Moffet
As Doug Lawson says, the cable should be a twist-to-lock type. In release the knob is turned about 1/4 turn to the left. To apply choke, release the cable and pull out, then turn to lock. To adjust, don't just push it in but release, adjust and relock. I suspect some cables wear prematurely because they are pushed in against the lock, wearing it out.
The change point for the ratchet lock choke cable is 1987, so as an '88 the OP may well have the later rubbish choke cable fitted.

https://www.minimania.com/part/NAM6384/Classic-Mini-Choke-Cable-Late-Mk11-And-Mk111

https://www.minimania.com/part/SBF10027/Classic-Mini-Choke-Cable-1987-And-Later-32-Inches-Long

IIRC they are interchangeble so if your cable looks like the one in the second link you can retrofit the earlier type. 
Sorry for getting back so late, buy my car actually has the NAM6384 fitted, or at least the knob is the same. I also have the one with the words lock on it (which I missed when I  went for my test drive), and also the propeller looking thing on it. I do not have the later version it would seem then... 

Could that be the reason why it does not lock? Somebody who owned or worked on it previously installed the older version while I might need the longer one? I also have a custom dashboard from customconsoles.co.uk (or that is what I think at least, deducing from pictures and such), so that would probably also influence the cable?
The one you have is the better one, though it is probably worn out. If it actuates the choke, then it is long enough. Unless your custom dashboard relocates the choke pull significantly, either to the side or farther away from the engine (which I doubt), it should not affect the needed length.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: May 16, 2019 11:40PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Moffet
As Doug Lawson says, the cable should be a twist-to-lock type. In release the knob is turned about 1/4 turn to the left. To apply choke, release the cable and pull out, then turn to lock. To adjust, don't just push it in but release, adjust and relock. I suspect some cables wear prematurely because they are pushed in against the lock, wearing it out.
The change point for the ratchet lock choke cable is 1987, so as an '88 the OP may well have the later rubbish choke cable fitted.

https://www.minimania.com/part/NAM6384/Classic-Mini-Choke-Cable-Late-Mk11-And-Mk111

https://www.minimania.com/part/SBF10027/Classic-Mini-Choke-Cable-1987-And-Later-32-Inches-Long

IIRC they are interchangeble so if your cable looks like the one in the second link you can retrofit the earlier type. 
Sorry for getting back so late, buy my car actually has the NAM6384 fitted, or at least the knob is the same. I also have the one with the words lock on it (which I missed when I  went for my test drive), and also the propeller looking thing on it. I do not have the later version it would seem then... 

Could that be the reason why it does not lock? Somebody who owned or worked on it previously installed the older version while I might need the longer one? I also have a custom dashboard from customconsoles.co.uk (or that is what I think at least, deducing from pictures and such), so that would probably also influence the cable?

 Posted: May 13, 2019 08:01AM
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My locking choke cable broke and when I replaced it I didn't realize the replacement didn't lock.  So I found if I pull the choke and start the engine, once it's running around 15-2000 rpm I can let go the choke and just hold it with the throttle.  I let it warm up a little before I back out of the garage using the parking brake and then it's ready to go.  A little heel/toe is sometimes required before it's fully warmed up.  No big deal.

 Posted: May 12, 2019 11:02AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malsal
I have also seen the solid inner cables that hold really well with no locking mechanism.
Most Triumphs use solid core cables for their choke and heat controls.  They do work well.  You could always try one in a Mini but you might find that the Mini has more or tighter bends getting to the carbs.  That might make them more difficult to push/pull due to the increased drag.

Doug L.
 Posted: May 12, 2019 09:48AM
 Edited:  May 13, 2019 08:24AM
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I install them and twist the inner cable slightly so it rides on the locking outer part this way you do not need to engage the lock fully the pressure provided by twisting it slightly holds the choke knob out.
I have also seen the solid inner cables that hold really well with no locking mechanism.


If in doubt, flat out. Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

Give a car more power and it goes faster on the straights,
make a car lighter and it's faster everywhere. Colin Chapman.

 Posted: May 12, 2019 07:03AM
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GB

I find that a choke cable only lasts about ten years of daily driving...

The "secret" is never fully turn the cable to lock it, just twist it enough to catch, and make sure it is fully disengaged before moving it in or out.

Adjusting the pull without fully undoing it will render it inoperative in very short order.

 Posted: May 12, 2019 06:39AM
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You're right Dan, I forgot all about you cold climate guys ... My bad.

In my climate, there is little need to actually drive while on choke after a cold start. Less than a minute warm-up usually does it. Frankly, I'm done with changing locking choke cables. In my experience, the lock feature just does not remain operable long enough to make it worth the effort. In 2 out of my 3 LBC's, the locking cable does not lock, and I'm fine with that.

 Posted: May 12, 2019 05:46AM
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CA
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Moffet
As Doug Lawson says, the cable should be a twist-to-lock type. In release the knob is turned about 1/4 turn to the left. To apply choke, release the cable and pull out, then turn to lock. To adjust, don't just push it in but release, adjust and relock. I suspect some cables wear prematurely because they are pushed in against the lock, wearing it out.
The change point for the ratchet lock choke cable is 1987, so as an '88 the OP may well have the later rubbish choke cable fitted.

https://www.minimania.com/part/NAM6384/Classic-Mini-Choke-Cable-Late-Mk11-And-Mk111

https://www.minimania.com/part/SBF10027/Classic-Mini-Choke-Cable-1987-And-Later-32-Inches-Long

IIRC they are interchangeble so if your cable looks like the one in the second link you can retrofit the earlier type. 
Good info. I haven't seen the later version, so was referring to the earlier pre-1987 one.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: May 12, 2019 05:40AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scargo
Or ... you can save all the work by simply holding the choke control out for the very short amount of time that a well tuned but cold running engine requires choking.
In a colder climate, even on a very well tuned engine, one may need choke for several minutes to adequately warm the engine, about the same amount of time it takes for the thermostat to open. It would be difficult to steer, change gears and hold the choke. Typically one might need full choke to start a cold engine, and feather it back gradually as the cold, rough-running engine smooths out. It isn't just engine temperature, but air temperature and humidity too.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: May 12, 2019 04:23AM
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Or ... you can save all the work by simply holding the choke control out for the very short amount of time that a well tuned but cold running engine requires choking.

 Posted: May 12, 2019 04:21AM
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GB
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Moffet
As Doug Lawson says, the cable should be a twist-to-lock type. In release the knob is turned about 1/4 turn to the left. To apply choke, release the cable and pull out, then turn to lock. To adjust, don't just push it in but release, adjust and relock. I suspect some cables wear prematurely because they are pushed in against the lock, wearing it out.
The change point for the ratchet lock choke cable is 1987, so as an '88 the OP may well have the later rubbish choke cable fitted.

https://www.minimania.com/part/NAM6384/Classic-Mini-Choke-Cable-Late-Mk11-And-Mk111

https://www.minimania.com/part/SBF10027/Classic-Mini-Choke-Cable-1987-And-Later-32-Inches-Long

IIRC they are interchangeble so if your cable looks like the one in the second link you can retrofit the earlier type. 

 Posted: May 11, 2019 01:58PM
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The clothespin story is not unique to the Mini, it's used by almost every British marque I know of where a manual choke is involved.  Don't be surprised if you see other British cars at shows with a clothespin clipped to the edge of the dash or similar location.

The quality of the current twist-to-lock chokes is not great.  In particular the late model version has a soft vinyl overmolded knob that is very easily damaged by twisting too hard.  That said, I believe it's also the longest choke cable and therefore may be the only one to work with your car.  You might want to see what shows up used on eBay for other British cars like MGAs and MGBs where the cable is a bit longer (and also had a nice "T" handle).  You can always make the cable shorter... longer isn't so easy!

Doug L.
 Posted: May 11, 2019 11:11AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onetim
The choke pin is a BMC product the was later discovered to be quite handy for pinning clothes to a line. I have a small plastic aftermarket version that has a taper for setting different idle speeds.

Following is a brief history of the various BMC/Rover choke pins or pegs;
From right to left there are 2 prototype examples followed by a works unit that allowed for a lanyard to be attached for quick removal. Next are the MK1 through MK5 examples, and lastly a Rover version.
Well, I just might leave it like it is and tell people this story! I like this a lot better

Seriously though, so I might try just ordering a new cable assy (or see if the old one still works because I had NO clue that you could turn it to lock and unlock.

Thanks for the input!

 Posted: May 10, 2019 06:40AM
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As Doug Lawson says, the cable should be a twist-to-lock type. In release the knob is turned about 1/4 turn to the left. To apply choke, release the cable and pull out, then turn to lock. To adjust, don't just push it in but release, adjust and relock. I suspect some cables wear prematurely because they are pushed in against the lock, wearing it out.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: May 10, 2019 05:58AM
 Edited:  May 14, 2019 01:21PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coolingthunder
I just bought a 1988 Saloon, and so far have been pretty happy with it.
There is a few things that I’d like to fix/improve/tool around with, but one of the first things I’d like to take care of is the choke.

The previous owner told me that the choke does work(which I tested), however sometimes (but not always) it tends to snap off, killing the engine if it’s cold. The workaround they had for this was attaching a clothespeg behind the button, so if it snapped shut that was just thick enough to keep the engine going. 

Anybody has any experience with this or any ideas what I could to fix this?

Thanks.

Jordy
one tim LOL.

Just replace the complete assembly as bot the inner cable end and outer sheath end wear out.


If in doubt, flat out. Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

Give a car more power and it goes faster on the straights,
make a car lighter and it's faster everywhere. Colin Chapman.

 Posted: May 10, 2019 05:13AM
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If the lengths are satisfactory (they may be too short) you might be able to use an earlier car's twist-to-lock choke cable.  However, the ones I have seen over the past few years have been junk and fail after a year or so.  Look at part numbers: 21A1202MS and NAM6384

Doug L.
 Posted: May 10, 2019 04:04AM
 Edited:  May 10, 2019 04:56AM
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The choke pin is a BMC product the was later discovered to be quite handy for pinning clothes to a line. I have a small plastic aftermarket version that has a taper for setting different idle speeds.

Following is a brief history of the various BMC/Rover choke pins or pegs;
From right to left there are 2 prototype examples followed by a works unit that allowed for a lanyard to be attached for quick removal. Next are the MK1 through MK5 examples, and lastly a Rover version.

 Posted: May 9, 2019 10:28PM
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I just bought a 1988 Saloon, and so far have been pretty happy with it.
There is a few things that I’d like to fix/improve/tool around with, but one of the first things I’d like to take care of is the choke.

The previous owner told me that the choke does work(which I tested), however sometimes (but not always) it tends to snap off, killing the engine if it’s cold. The workaround they had for this was attaching a clothespeg behind the button, so if it snapped shut that was just thick enough to keep the engine going. 

Anybody has any experience with this or any ideas what I could to fix this?

Thanks.

Jordy