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 Posted: Aug 5, 2019 01:31PM
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Works for gently taking them apart too! Use a little pen magnet to grab the keepers. I didn't show it, but just a little block of wood about 1/4" thick and 1" x 2" to fit in the combustion chamber keeps the valves closed while you work...

 Posted: Aug 5, 2019 12:32PM
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Jemal: I like your idea of using the drill press to compress the valve springs. Nice to have the cylinder head sitting flat on a work surface.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Aug 5, 2019 11:16AM
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Watch this short video from my YouTube channel. It explains the problem with those heads and those rocker sets in particular! Show it to your machine shop! I've talked about using Subaru valve seals. Here's how and why:

 Posted: Aug 2, 2019 05:52PM
TRP
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I was on the fence about pulling the head. Unfortunately when I pulled the valve cover off I noticed that the number 3 exhaust valve looked a little bit 'off'.  Have a look. It appears as though it's mushroomed a bit. Looks like I'll be pulling the head and sending it off to the machine shop.

Not what I wanted to do but after finding this I think it's the best thing.  All other valves and rockers look great.

Oh, motor is a listed as the MiniMania "High Performance" 1275

 

  • High compression (9.75:1) performance pistons.
  • Aluminum cylinder head.
  • A fast road camshaft (276 degrees duration)

On top of that someone added the 1.5 ratio rockers and dual valve springs by Esky. 

7 hardened valves and 1 not so hardened.

 Posted: Aug 2, 2019 03:16PM
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TRP.. I always  replace ALL the seal and guides when I have Engine Service here in  Shelby NC>. 28150  ..do the heads... later bc

 Posted: Aug 2, 2019 05:48AM
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The valve seals arrived today. LOL. They are TINY!! I figured they would be about the size of the tip of my index finger or something close. LOL.

They are about 2x the size of a pencil eraser.  I'm taking the car to the paint shop this morning to have them look at a few blemishes in the new paint. After that I'll pop the valve cover and get a better idea of what I'm working with.  I'm on the fence about pulling the head and sending it out for rework. 

thanks again!
Ted

 Posted: Jul 30, 2019 12:51PM
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Not a problem, trading information is always good.

 

"To catch one, you need one"....John Cooper

 Posted: Jul 30, 2019 09:51AM
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Croc7 - sorry to hijack your thread.

 Posted: Jul 29, 2019 08:10PM
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An email reply from Keith Calver states that he uses valve guide seals at all eight locations for street engines.  And his recommendation for seals are the ones refered to in this thread, LJQ101160

 

"To catch one, you need one"....John Cooper

 Posted: Jul 29, 2019 04:30PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malsal
 
If you are going to loosen up and remove the rocker shaft be sure to drain a good portion of the water and anti freeze out of the system as it may help with any possible head gasket seepage.

Also when compressing the valves rest a magnet against the spring so you don't loose any keepers.

However, if he has the spring spacers between the rocker arms (not the solid spacers) he won't have to loosen the rocker shaft.  All that is required is to push the rocker to the side to make room for the spring compressor.  The two outermost rockers at the ends of the shaft have to come completely off but that does not require loosening or removing the rocker shaft or pedestals.

Good idea with the magnet.  I used magnets to pluck the collets off the valve stem.  It never occurred to me to use a magnet to keep the collets from becoming projectiles.

Doug L.
 Posted: Jul 29, 2019 03:26PM
 Edited:  Jul 29, 2019 03:29PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRP
Thank you both for your replies! I think I can get through that without botching things up too bad.

I picked up 10 seals (8 for the valves and two extras in case I bork a couple of them.)

I suppose if the valves wiggle I can just go forward and remove the head. 

Ted
Yes i would at that point.

If you are going to loosen up and remove the rocker shaft be sure to drain a good portion of the water and anti freeze out of the system as it may help with any possible head gasket seepage.

Also when compressing the valves rest a magnet against the spring so you don't loose any keepers.


If in doubt, flat out. Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

Give a car more power and it goes faster on the straights,
make a car lighter and it's faster everywhere. Colin Chapman.

 Posted: Jul 29, 2019 02:23PM
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Thank you both for your replies! I think I can get through that without botching things up too bad.

I picked up 10 seals (8 for the valves and two extras in case I bork a couple of them.)

I suppose if the valves wiggle I can just go forward and remove the head. 

Ted

 Posted: Jul 29, 2019 01:47PM
 Edited:  Jul 29, 2019 01:50PM
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And while you have the spring removed on each valve you can check the guide for wear by moving the valve stem side to side, there should be very little almost no movement, if you find movement you need guides.

There is also a small overhead valve spring compressor that you use a wheel to compress the spring that works well.


If in doubt, flat out. Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

Give a car more power and it goes faster on the straights,
make a car lighter and it's faster everywhere. Colin Chapman.

 Posted: Jul 29, 2019 12:39PM
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The actual name of the type of compressor you need is a "lever type" compressor.  It will have hooks that go around the rocker shaft.  See the link below.
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51tCSuihiLL._SX466_.jpg

Remove the rocker cover and all the spark plugs.  Completely loosen each valve adjuster screw.  Feed about 1 foot of clean cotton rope into one cylinder through the spark plug hole (leave several inches hanging out of the plug hole).  Turn the engine over BY HAND until you feel the piston squish the rope against the bottom side of the head.  Then slide the rocker arm sideways against the spacer spring and fit the compressor to the rocker shaft.  Push the lever arm of the compressor down to compress the spring and use a strong magnet to pick the collets off the valve stem.  The rockers on the very ends of the shaft have to be removed (cotter pins and washers).  The rope will hold the valves up while you do all of this.  Fit the new guide seals and reverse these steps to complete the installation.  Remember to turn the engine backwards a small bit so you can remove the rope and move on to the next cylinder.

Buy the later model Viton seal with the garter spring on the top of the seal (link below).
https://www.minimania.com/part/LJQ101160/Classic-Austin-Mini-Valve-Stem-Seal-Late-Mpi-Type-Viton

Is it worth it?  Maybe.  It will only cost you about $20 in parts and probably another $25 or $30 for the tool to try this.  If it works... great.  If the oil burning continues... it was not the seals.  If it is better for a while and then the smoke returns, you can plan on removing the head and having new guides installed.  

Doug L.
 Posted: Jul 29, 2019 11:31AM
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Hey Doug,

Thanks for the reply. The car sat for 20  years in a warehouse in Washington prior to my purchasing it.  The motor itself has very few miles on it. I'm wondering if it's worth it to try the seals and then pull the head if necessary?  Is this  a fools errand? I've never pulled a water cooled head before. Seems relatively straight forward. 

I've seen a few different types of spring compressors. Some use a hammer to whack the spring to pull or insert the keepers. Yikes. Others compress the spring by grabbing the spring itself and then pinching it (no lever/fulcrum).  Aside from those two tools, can you link me to an example of the type you were referring to? 

Thanks again!

Ted Pierson 
Morgan Hill, CA

 Posted: Jul 27, 2019 06:04PM
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You can replace the seals with the head on as long as you don't have solid spacers between the rocker arms (springs are used as spacers in the OEM setup).  You need a hook-type valve spring compressor and you will need some clean cotton rope to hold the valves up while you use the compressor.

However, if the seals have failed there is also a good chance that the guides are worn.  Try the new seals but if the smoke returns relatively quickly you can anticipate head work in the future.

Doug L.
 Posted: Jul 27, 2019 11:46AM
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This is extremely timely for me. My mini is on the road again after a very long hiatus. One thing I've noticed is that after driving it for a bit, when I'm at idle, or when starting after sitting a bit she will offer up a nice super light blue smoke tint to the exhaust. It's not horrible but noticeable..

Can the valve seals be replaced with the head on the car or do I need to pull the head? The motor is a healthy 1275cc with an aluminum head. I'm assuming the seals dried out due to the previous owner having let the car sit for 20 years.

i'd prefer not to pull the head because its running great other than the occasional 2 stroke imitation.

Ted

 Posted: Jul 24, 2019 02:50PM
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It is quite normal to do only intakes. Why you ask? there is always vacuum in the intake tract. This would tend to draw oil down the guide. The exhaust on the other hand always has pressure in the ports which tends to keep oil from running down the guide. What oil does get by lubes the valve stem in a very hot and dry area. Steve (CTR)

 Posted: Jul 24, 2019 01:07PM
 Edited:  Jul 24, 2019 01:10PM
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Valve guide seals on all eight or just on inlets?  Reasoning for doing so?

 

"To catch one, you need one"....John Cooper