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 Posted: Jan 5, 2022 03:52PM
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Last post: May 13, 2022
Member since:Feb 27, 2007
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Thanks Jedduh,
These cones have been in since 2008, on a Moke that's not hardly moved since then, they were a cheap aftermarket style that compressed very easily so I should have known that they would not last. They have been in for about 18 years so I guess everything sags with age!

I've installed many cones (my first was in 1977 in England) most of the ones I've changed out were in Boise & SLC where the temp was in the 90's, that's why I was wondering if softening the cone's durometer with heat might help.

I use the metric compressor tool from our host, 660330A but the cones on a cold Utah day (22°F) were putting up a fight so I've decided to wait till we get warmer temps.
BTW, my brother-in-law in England (a mechanic) told me Saturday that they often warm the cones up.
Thanks, M.

"Nature Bats Last"
 Posted: Jan 5, 2022 06:36AM
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US
Seeing your old cone ( very squished) vs new cone ... I question your install practice.

   The old cone so flat would likely EASILY let the knuckle and trumpet fall out ( if it wasn't stuck ) not having to remove the upper control arm on the fronts.
 
New cones are soo tall  the NEW cone must be installed in the frame with the upper arm out of the way. THen compress the cone with the tool = then it is a puzzle but do able to compress the cone ... work the trumpet in ,  then work the knuckle in with the upper arm all slipping in together.

 I personally dont think 'boiling' or warming your cones will do much of anything.. both  Harm the cone / and or be beneficial.
   

Cone compresssor tool is required ,   I have used a metric bolt with some bars + washers if no tool on hand.

 Goodluck

 Posted: Jan 3, 2022 11:08PM
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US
Off topic, Hi Martin. Nice to say Hi. Sara is in Park City Now.

 Posted: Jan 2, 2022 09:35AM
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Thanks Minimike1

"Nature Bats Last"
 Posted: Jan 1, 2022 09:02PM
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US
don't  put them in a pot to boil.  You can pour the hot water over the springs in a container not on a flame.

 Posted: Jan 1, 2022 12:31PM
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Thanks 6464s, I'm thinking of heating them up in a pot of water to say 130°F, that's about how hot it gets here in Utah in my workshop.

"Nature Bats Last"
 Posted: Jan 1, 2022 11:45AM
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I would not boil the cones in a pot. I might put them in a pot and pour the hot boiled water over them. The transference of heat  will not be instantaneous  and the loss of heat from 212F will be quick. I do this with rattle can spray paints.

 Posted: Jan 1, 2022 10:13AM
Total posts: 136
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Question on installing new suspension cones into the Moke & P.U., the temp in my workshop is 24°F and the cones are putting up a fight to compress them enough. It it OK to warm them up in some hot water to make them more manageable? And it so is boiling water too hot?
Images shows 10 year old cone with new cone.
Thanks, Martin.

"Nature Bats Last"