Classic Mini Site Wide Sale
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Gearboxes
Created: February 06, 2014
Evo (Trannex) 1950s design with 1990s engineering and technology - originally done by the inimitable Davc Hirons at Trannex, now under the EVO banner at Mini Spares Centre following their buy-out of all the Mini/Sprite Trannex products some years back now. The only real similarity to the old Sali...
How do I know which transmission my Classic Mini has?
Created: January 20, 2014
It’s really quite easy to tell which generation of gearbox, shift linkage, and axles your Mini has. Let’s say you want to order a replacement but terms like “remote”, “rod-change”, or “pot-joints” have you a little befuddled about just what the heck to order! Let’s very simply describe the three styles of transmissions and axles used in the production of the Classic Mini.
Classic Mini Cooper Gearbox - Common sources of problems
Created: October 28, 2002
A gearbox needs careful and proper attention when building it up. It's the knowledge of what to look for prior to and during the build that sets the 'professional' builders apart.
ENGINE TRANSPLANTS - gearbox information
Created: November 01, 2000
Selecting the right final drive ration is a subject worthy of an entire book to explain the whys and wherefores, and also causes much consternation on the part of the transplanter. Much confusion’s spread over which gearbox has the best ratios, is best to use, and with which FD. For a detailed account on this and covering all gearboxes fitted as standard to the Mini, see the relevant separate articles 'Gearbox - Standard production gearbox types'.
Created: October 31, 2000
The standard drop gears are fine for practically all road use - almost irrespective of power output. Despite what many folk believe - they are more than strong enough, and will perform perfectly well if correctly set up. That means getting the idler and primary gear end floats right, and using new bearings for the idler gear at each re-build.
Created: October 30, 2000
Elsewhere we've considered what alternative standard production ratios are available - but that still leaves you with the power-consuming and limited-ratio alternatives helical tooth type gears. Not desirable in a competition orientated car. The solution to this comes in the form of several types of straight-cut gear sets
Created: October 30, 2000
The standard diff unit’s componentry falls well short in the performance stakes. As an absolute minimum you should fit an up-rated diff-pin - whether this is because your racing regs don’t allow alternatives, or merely for the road - along with new planet-wheels and thrust washers.
Created: October 26, 2000
The final drive gears are ultimately responsible for the way your Mini goes after engine, gearbox, and under carriage tweaking has been applied. The aforementioned and the degree to which it has been done will affect the decision as to what Final Drive is required. They’re also responsible for much discussion between many tuning freaks, and confusion to the less informed.
GEARBOX - How they work
Created: October 25, 2000
Having decided on or even implemented a course of action to bolster the performance of your Mini’s engine, maximising it’s potential should encompass a good look at the gearbox. It rarely does, as most folk take one look at those seemingly formidable teeth and decide it's not for them and stay well clear.
GEARBOX - standard production gearbox types
Created: October 24, 2000
I’m sure we’re all aware of Sir Alec Issigonis’ brilliant solution to the gearbox location in the Mini - just fold it up underneath the engine, simple. Following is a résumé of the production gearboxes to date. The first Minis rolled off the production line with a three-syncro gearbox,
Quick Shift Kit, Remote & Rod change, C-22A1750 & C-22A1751
Created: January 29, 2000
1. Remove original gearstick. Fit KAD Quickstick with original plastic collar, spring and spring retainer, grease well and refit with new spacer. Place flange downwards using longer 5/16" UNC capscrews.