We have detected you're not on the correct site for the car you have selected! Click the green button below to go to the correct site.
Select your car: 
BMW Mini Cooper
Select
   Forum Width:     Forum Type: 

 Posted: Jan 19, 2021 09:38AM
Total posts: 189
Last post: Mar 6, 2021
Member since:Jan 22, 2018
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
No. Yes.

 Posted: Jan 19, 2021 05:22AM
Total posts: 1
Last post: Jan 19, 2021
Member since:Oct 3, 2017
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
I have the similar problem with my 998cc Mini. I am going to check the fuel float level. Do I need to put a new seal before I close the lid? Or Can I still use the old seal? 

 Posted: Dec 30, 2015 03:41PM
Total posts: 10069
Last post: Feb 3, 2021
Member since:Mar 24, 1999
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
GB

Have you changed the condensor ?
If that has gone bad it will sputter and potentially die as the electrics in the dizzy warm up a touch.

There was a bad batch (that lasted many years) made to a price by reducing (so I am reliably told) the amount of wire in the winding inside.  For a change it wasn't the Chinese, the iffy ones I have were made in Turkey...
Once the big suppliers twigged what was going on they started getting their own manufactured. 

//www.minimania.com/part/GSC110/Condensor-45-49d-Resin-Type--Sprite--Mg-Midget--Mini

 

 

 Posted: Dec 30, 2015 03:19PM
Total posts: 8719
Last post: Mar 6, 2021
Member since:Aug 14, 2002
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
CA

Back to the basic problem solving.

You have gas getting to the carb. So, as you concluded, it seems to be the carb.

  1. Check the fuel bowl immediaely after it sputters and dies. Remove the 3 screws and lift the top off. Don't worry about the seal at this stage. The float and inlet jet & needle are attached to the lid. 
  2. What level is the fuel in the bowl? Really low, or about 3/4 full with the float removed? If really low, fuel might not be getting past the inlet jet and needle. Take the lid to a clean table, turn it upside down, remove the float carefully and then the needle. Inspect it for gum, dirt etc. The tip is a blunt cone: is it smooth or does it hae a wear ring around it? If worn, replace.
  3. Next, with a socket wrench, remove the brass jet. Check that its orifice and bore are clean and smooth. If not, replace.
    Check the top of the jet for dirt. There may be a tiny dirt screen attrached to it - inspect it for dirt and clean or replace.
  4. Check the port that delivers fuel to the top of the jet for dirt, scum and debris. Check the overflow/vent port too.
  5. Go back to the fuel bowl. Is it spotlessly clean in the bottom? If not, you will need to remove and clean it.
  6. By now, you are into taking the carb apart. To remove the bowl, you will also have to remove the main jet. That means taking the dashpot off first and setting it carefully aside. Check and protect the long needle.
  7. Back to the carb: look down into it from above and see where the top of the main jet is: you should see the "bridge" with concentric rings of aluminum and brass in the middle of it. The aluminum should be the jet holder, and the brass core with the hole is the main jet. Look how far the tip of the brass is down from the top of the bridge - it should be somewhere around 1/8" down, maybe more, maybe less - but remembe where (use a cell phone camera!).
  8. Now you can go under the carb and remove the jet without disturbing the the jet holder and retaining nut. You will need to disconnect the choke rod. You should be able to slide the jet out gently, still attached to the fuel bowl. Now remove the fuel bowl and take it and the jet to the workbench.
  9. Carefully disconnect the little tube from the bottom of the carb, Be careful not to lose any seals or O-rings etc. Clean the fuel bowl and blow air throught the jet to make sure it and the tube are not blocked.
  10. Do NOT use any abrasive on the jet, the main needle, the dashpot or anything that might be a close tolerance fit.
  11. Re-assemble in reverse order.
  12. Before putting the fuel bow top on, check the float level adjustment. Maybe add a bit of fresh fuel to aid in starting.

When you start the car, use the choke. Once it starts, gradually release the choke as it warms up. If it starts to falter, try revving it gently to keep rpms jsut above idle. 

 

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Dec 30, 2015 02:29PM
Total posts: 10069
Last post: Feb 3, 2021
Member since:Mar 24, 1999
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
GB

If you're going to start fitting Stage One kits or modifying the car then I'll agree that the fixed jet HS4 is easier to tune. 
If the car is standard however, I'd keep the waxstat and the standard needle to minimise the buggeration factor of going to a rolling road with an SU-savvy operator - something that is far harder to do in the US than over here.  BL did know what they were doing with the mixture, and the waxstat does work like the bimetallic strip in an HIF.

 Posted: Dec 30, 2015 09:35AM
Total posts: 8347
Last post: Feb 25, 2021
Member since:Feb 7, 2006
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex
Quote:
Originally Posted by triggerboy

i quote:  " Check that the jet moves freely up and down with the choke cable.  If it has been smashed against the bulkhead it may not be returning to the normal running position "...... So if the jet doesnt move freely,what is the solution???

 

suggestion:  If you guys gives out a possible problem, please give the possible solution to it as well.. thank you.

Well,,, gosh,,,, I dunno,,,, PERHAPS CHANGE IT FOR ONE THAT ISN'T BENT...

You really must have fallen off the tit before your momma got round to spoonfeeding you, and ended up brain damaged.

And if it is a waxstat jet change it out for the earlier jet which is far superior to the waxstat one.

If in doubt, flat out. Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

Give a car more power and it goes faster on the straights,
make a car lighter and it's faster everywhere. Colin Chapman.

 Posted: Dec 30, 2015 09:14AM
Total posts: 10069
Last post: Feb 3, 2021
Member since:Mar 24, 1999
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
GB
Quote:
Originally Posted by triggerboy

i quote:  " Check that the jet moves freely up and down with the choke cable.  If it has been smashed against the bulkhead it may not be returning to the normal running position "...... So if the jet doesnt move freely,what is the solution???

 

suggestion:  If you guys gives out a possible problem, please give the possible solution to it as well.. thank you.

Well,,, gosh,,,, I dunno,,,, PERHAPS CHANGE IT FOR ONE THAT ISN'T BENT...

You really must have fallen off the tit before your momma got round to spoonfeeding you, and ended up brain damaged.

 Posted: Dec 26, 2015 06:25PM
Total posts: 431
Last post: Mar 28, 2016
Member since:Oct 2, 2015
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0

i quote:  " Check that the jet moves freely up and down with the choke cable.  If it has been smashed against the bulkhead it may not be returning to the normal running position "...... So if the jet doesnt move freely,what is the solution???

 

suggestion:  If you guys gives out a possible problem, please give the possible solution to it as well.. thank you.

 

 Posted: Dec 26, 2015 03:48PM
Total posts: 10069
Last post: Feb 3, 2021
Member since:Mar 24, 1999
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
GB

First thing to check is the state of your engine steady bushes !
If the engine is free to rock back and forth, the carb jet can come into sharp contact with the bulkhead when extended and will get damaged quite badly quite quickly. 

Second thing to check is the carb jet.
You've almost certainly got a waxstat jet fitted - a service item that never get changed.  If is it brown and covered in sticky fuel residue it needs changing. 
Check that the jet moves freely up and down with the choke cable.  If it has been smashed against the bulkhead it may not be returning to the normal running position and could explain why the engine is choking out.

Third thing is to ignore Triggerboy - he's a repeat offender Troll, and generally gives out terrible/dangerous advice.

 Posted: Dec 26, 2015 02:56PM
Total posts: 55
Last post: Jun 18, 2020
Member since:Feb 12, 2015
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0

Not much of an update.  But I wanted to see if fuel is even getting past the fuel pump so I unplugged the hose going into the bowl.  Started the car up and fuel is indeed flowing.  So I guess the problem lies in the carb...somewhere.  I honestly dont even know where to start.

 Posted: Dec 26, 2015 07:41AM
Total posts: 8719
Last post: Mar 6, 2021
Member since:Aug 14, 2002
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
CA

Todd: There is a specific way to set the float level for a HS4. See the manual. It works something like the tank on a toilet - it should not be completely full with the float in place, and the float takes up space. So, when you remove the lid, lifting the float out of the fuel, the fuel bowl should be roughly around 3/4 full. Since the fuel bowl is connected to the bottom of the main jet, at rest, the fuel level in the bowl and jet are the same. You want the level in the jet where it is ideal for the carb draft to pull it out into the intake air stream. Setting the float level correctly accomplishes that.  The fuel bowl also acts as a reservoir for sudden changes in fuel demand. But the pump and fuel line should be up to keeping it full. Hard cornering can affect the carb too, if the level is low or flow insufficient.

Most Minis did not come with a fuel filter, but you should have one - it can be added into the fuel line either before the pump if you have an electric one, or just before the carb in the engine bay if you have a mechanical or electric pump. The second location is easier to install and monitor; the only drawback is that it protects only the carb and not the pump. Get a clear plastic one so you can see if the gas is flowing and if it is clean. Without a filter, dirt particles can clog the bowl intake needle, or jam it open, or collect in the bottom of the bowl, clogging up the tube to the jet. It doesn't take a big piece of dirt to mess up any carb's function.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Dec 26, 2015 06:27AM
Total posts: 55
Last post: Jun 18, 2020
Member since:Feb 12, 2015
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spitz

I'm guesing you mean 998.  Is it an HS4 carb ( float bowl on the side ) or HIF38

I'm sure Todd is aware of the choke.

One thing is that the choke may actually be stuck "open" when the knob is pushed in.  Something to check

Apologies...yes I meant 998 and indeed, I have an HS4.  Question though...should that bowl always be filled to the top w/ fuel?  I noticed when I changed the float gasket that there some fuel in there but not filled.  Some coworkers of mine suggested I change out the fuel filter, but to my knowledge...classic Mini's do not have one built from the factory.  Is this correct?

 Posted: Dec 26, 2015 05:38AM
Total posts: 8719
Last post: Mar 6, 2021
Member since:Aug 14, 2002
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
CA
Quote:
Originally Posted by triggerboy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cup Cake

Are you using the choke when you start? A-series with an SU carb requires the choke to get going in all temperatures. 

huh?? does this mean the choke should be used while driving?? i thought only when you start the car in a cold morning?  you said it should get going in ALL temperatures eh, i dont get it. pls explain i might be missing something, i have an A+ Su carb too.

An engine is tuned for optimum performance in a given environment, including outside temperature - when the engine is properly warmed up. Until the engine IS warmed up, tuning is compromised. The computer in modern fuel-injected cars monitors outside air temp, intake air temp, engine temp amd exhaust analysis. It constantly monitors all of these and makes adjustments second by second as you drive. When you first start a cold fuel-injected car, it does not fire right away, but you need to crank it some until the sensors take their readings. when it does fire, the computer richens the mixture to 'light the fire' and opens the throttle to provide fast idle until the computer gets better readings as the engine warms up. Pay attention to what happens next time you start it. In mild temperatures, the idle speed will drop in a few seconds, but in cold weather it will take longer. You might see 1500 rpm, then it gradually drops to around 800 rpm, depending on the car and engine. The computer is also fiddling around with the timing at the same time. 

NOW! A carbed engine has no computer to do all this automatically, so the driver has to be the "brain'. Before starting on a cold day, the driver should pull the choke out far enough to richen the mixture (how much depends on how cold it is) and to engage the fast-idle cam. Then you crank the engine until if fires up. Itr will run rough until the combustion chamers get warmed by the fire, but as it smooths out, the fast idle speed should be around (surprise) 1500 rpm. As you warm the engine, or drive gently to do so, you should be gradually releasing the choke until the engine idles smoothly with no choke. Just like the computer in the fuel-injected car does.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Dec 26, 2015 05:10AM
Total posts: 431
Last post: Mar 28, 2016
Member since:Oct 2, 2015
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cup Cake

Are you using the choke when you start? A-series with an SU carb requires the choke to get going in all temperatures. 

huh?? does this mean the choke should be used while driving?? i thought only when you start the car in a cold morning?  you said it should get going in ALL temperatures eh, i dont get it. pls explain i might be missing something, i have an A+ Su carb too.

 

 Posted: Dec 25, 2015 11:40PM
 Edited:  Dec 25, 2015 11:41PM
Total posts: 13899
Last post: Feb 22, 2021
Member since:Jan 22, 2003
Cars in Garage: 4
Photos: 381
WorkBench Posts: 1
CA

I'm guesing you mean 998.  Is it an HS4 carb ( float bowl on the side ) or HIF38

I'm sure Todd is aware of the choke.

One thing is that the choke may actually be stuck "open" when the knob is pushed in.  Something to check

 

"Everybody should own a MINI at some point, or you are incomplete as a human being" - James May

"WET COOPER", Partsguy1 (Terry Snell of Penticton BC ) - Could you send the money for the unpaid parts and court fees.
Ordered so by a Judge

 

 

 

 Posted: Dec 25, 2015 10:07PM
Total posts: 10335
Last post: Aug 19, 2016
Member since:May 13, 2001
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0

Are you using the choke when you start? A-series with an SU carb requires the choke to get going in all temperatures. 

The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. G.B.S. Sarcasm is the lowest form of wit. Oscar Wilde

//www.cupcakecooper.ca/

 Posted: Dec 25, 2015 09:35PM
Total posts: 431
Last post: Mar 28, 2016
Member since:Oct 2, 2015
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0

check the float ang the  fuel valve stop ,,check if the rubber tip is worn out, it might be flooding the stupet spark plug. ,  do this: after it sputters remove one spark plug and inspect , if its wet then it must be flooding. that stupid valve stop is the culprit, and also inspect if there is gas in the overflow tube, it should be dry and no gas.

are you still using the ancient points distributor??  if yes then check the points gap., and change the condenser if its too old.  chinese condensers nowadays only last for 1 month if you're lucky.   you may want to adjust the timing as well, is your mni overheating?? oh sorry what a stupiid question, i forgot all minis overheat, sorry my bad.  

btw is your username suzukitodd??  im sure you are not the todd that i know, who lives in sanfo and owns a red mni with a yorkshire bank advertisement sticker on the side. ( of all advertisements in this workd,WHY bank?????gosh).

anyway, hope you resolve your mini problem soon good luck!!

 

 Posted: Dec 25, 2015 08:48PM
 Edited:  Dec 26, 2015 06:24AM
Total posts: 55
Last post: Jun 18, 2020
Member since:Feb 12, 2015
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0

Merry Christmas to all,


My 82 Mini (998) sputters when it starts then dies a few minutes later.  I have new spark plugs/wires, new manual fuel pump, new float/needle, dashpot has oil, points are good...and there is fuel in the tank.  I have no idea what could be causing the sputtering.  The sputtering started happening 2 months ago as I was headed to work.  I shipped the car over in March from the UK, and had to replace a bunch of stuff but for the most part of the summer/fall...she ran great.  Any help/advice is greatly appreciated.