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 Posted: Feb 11, 2019 09:40AM
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3M makes a panel bonder for gluing on sheet metal part's when they are not structural, supposed to be common in auto body repair. But it's only for lap joint work. It would be it's own sealer though, and no rivets needed. I have thought of using it to replace my battery box, as well as to fix a weber cut firewall hole. People that weld don't seem to think much of it though, I guess as it's hard to remove in the future.

 Posted: Feb 11, 2019 08:45AM
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CA
Ah, clearer now. On my Mini, there was a small area of the spare tire well that had rusted out. I cut and beat a piece of sheet metal to fit the curved surface and set it in place with Mono sealant and secured it with pop rivets. Still good 18 years later. 

My car (1980's) had something sprayed on under the floor at the factory but it was much thinner - hardly thicker than paint. It was dry and flaking, leaving nice original factory paint. Inside in the footwells is something thicker, black and brittle (and factory painted over)  but I think it hardly more than sound-deadening stuff.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Feb 10, 2019 10:29AM
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Yes Dan, I'm working on the floor pans. The factory used this black stuff like poured tar and is about 3/16 thick. Hard and brittle.

MiniMike, I've used the Lexel on the inner sills before on this this mini. Held up nicely, no complaints. Used on the inside and outside. Of course painted over.

 Posted: Feb 10, 2019 09:48AM
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pay now or pay later.  I'd spend the few extra dollars that makes the job go easier and better.  When you try to cut corners,
that's what you end up.  A job that you'll eventually have to redo.  do it right the first time.

 Posted: Feb 10, 2019 07:28AM
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You still didn't say where the patches are - will they be visible e.g. on a door or fender, or somewhere hidden like under the floor?

If it is on a fender, A-panel, door etc. I would use a bondo type product. If your patches are welded in, then there will be virtually no movement between them and the surrounding metal.

The videos I looked at for Quad Max is that it is a caulking/sealant for buildings, e.g. around window frames etc. It is very stretchy and an automotive paint will crack (in my opinion) If I was patching a hole in the floor, I'd consider it, but not anywhere I would want it to be seen. I suppose you could use it on the back side of a patch to keep moisture out.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Feb 9, 2019 04:54PM
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I'm leaving the welds and not sanding or grinding them smooth. I would like to blend the patched pieces  with some sort sealant lexel or quad max or something as cheap so that it would look good.

 Posted: Feb 9, 2019 12:57PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6464
Thanks Mike, Right now, I'm not interested in spending $40 to $50 for a tube of seam sealer. I know that Lexel is a caulk which has excellent adhesion, can be spread and textured with a paint thinner soak rag. I'm looking for something to spread/cover over the patched welding plates.

I might experiment with Quad Max. That is supposed to have excellent adhesion. I was wondering if anyone has found other products that has excellent adhesion and keeps out the moisture out, long lasting and is cheap.
Are you trying to blend a patch in with the rest of a body contour or just seal around a non-visble (e.g. floor) patch?

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Feb 9, 2019 09:36AM
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 Posted: Feb 9, 2019 04:58AM
 Edited:  Feb 9, 2019 04:56PM
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Thanks Mike, Right now, I'm not interested in spending $40 to $50 for a tube of seam sealer. I know that Lexel is a caulk which has excellent adhesion, can be spread and textured with a paint thinner soak rag. I'm looking for something to spread/cover over the patched welding plates.

I might experiment with Quad Max. That is supposed to have excellent adhesion. I was wondering if anyone has found other products that has excellent adhesion and keeps out the moisture out, does not shrink, long lasting and is cheap.

 Posted: Feb 8, 2019 06:12PM
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Lexell is not for seam sealing.  BTW, new Harbor Freight in Riverhead near the circle

 Posted: Feb 8, 2019 12:17PM
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I use brush-on seam sealer for all the factory-correct areas (toe-boards, interior seams, inside the hood/boot areas etc.), and then a caulk-style seam sealer for all the areas the factory didn't use seam sealer (but should have), between exterior panel seams, inside seam covers etc. 

There's plenty of brands making good stuff at reasonable prices, I can recommend both SEM brand available at auto body shops or Amazon, and also Eastwood for both types of sealer. 

One can of each type should be more than plenty for the entire car.  

 Posted: Feb 8, 2019 07:52AM
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I have always used "brush on" seam sealer.  You can buy it in a 30 oz can from Eastwood for $31 (Item #51657ZP).  I use disposable "acid brushes" to apply the seam sealer.  You can also buy the acid brushes at Eastwood but they are MUCH cheaper at Harbor Freight.

Doug L.
 Posted: Feb 8, 2019 07:13AM
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SEM or 3M 2 part you'll need the dual mix gun. 

https://www.autobodytoolmart.com/searchnxt.aspx?keywords=seam%20sealer

 

 

 Posted: Feb 8, 2019 06:20AM
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Hi guys, I've been cutting out the rusted spots on my mini and welding in patches. I went to my local auto parts store and they wanted $44 for a caulk tube of seam sealer. In the past, I've used a product like LEXEL, caulk tube as well, which is paintable and is quite sticky, develops a skin and stays pliable. Tell me what other products are out there. Thanks