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 Posted: Jun 18, 2019 03:04PM
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CA
Thanks for the saga, Mike. I know not to put any on the studs or nuts. I will also be scoping out some proper solid lug nuts - it has the chintzy tin-capped factory ones. One tin cap is already gone and others are loose. Each wheel already has a locking nut, so we will be keeping them. The jeep, by the way is a 2010 Liberty Limited with just about ALL the accessories. It came from Windsor Ontario and had 103,000 km on it when traded. We are still trying to figure out all the electronic "advances" and are thankful it isn't a 2019 for that reason. Makes me love the Mini even more!

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Jun 18, 2019 12:32PM
 Edited:  Jun 18, 2019 12:38PM
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CA
Dan,

All good advice.  I beat the livin crap out of my BINI rims the first spring I went to take them off and swap on the summer wheels as the aluminum bonded/oxidized itself to the steel hub and it was stuck on there like I have never experienced before in my life.  2x4's, cursing, kicking and what-have-you all were tried and in the end I used a gargantuan screwdriver between the wheel and hub and beat the cr@p out of it. 
Between that and using a sledge hammer, onto a 4x4, onto the wheel rim I eventually freed them up. (I dealt with 8 wheels, so learned my lesson 8 times over--doh !)

Soooooo, that being said I always use a little dab of copper paste on mating surfaces between steel and aluminum.  Now they practically drop right off, ploooop !

I would definitely loosen and retorque, then recheck them after a couple hundred kms.  Every time I DON'T I find I have 1 or 2 very loose lugnuts on each car some days later at the most inopportune time.  It really sucks in mid December, in a snowstorm, out on a 2-lane highway and your wheel is clunking so badly, you can't even make it to the next turn.  Maybe your Jeep doesn't have the same center hub (tapered) that the Binis do, but they are conical on the 2009 and 2012's I own, so there's always the chance they won't fit on there (very tightly) perfectly perpendicular (square?) and so after some driving, the wheel may shift ever so slightly, making 1 or 2 lugbolts (not nuts) appear to be loose.

I have also experienced the rattle gun guru's gusto many many times, so much so, my own 350lbs/in air-gun at home would not loosen them up the same day and I had to resort to a 24" breaker bar and 4' cheater pipe on them to break it loose.  Don't ever get a flat if you just rely on the monkey's to torque your wheels to the right spec ! ;-()

OK, I think I have imparted enough Northern knowledge (basically by agreeing with most you've already been given).

To recap.....use copper paste on dissimilar metals--but not the lugnuts or bolts.
Loosen, retorque and check'm again in a few days.

Have fun Jeepin'

  ~ 30 minutes in a Mini is more therapeutic than 3 sessions @ the shrink. ~

  Mike  Cool  NB, Canada   

 Posted: Jun 18, 2019 07:20AM
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Just an FYI, most tire retailers do use a rattle gun to install wheels, but they use torque sticks on the gun, they look like 5" extensions, color coded to the torque value intended to the car their working on. Snap-on and Sunex sell a nice set.

 Posted: Jun 18, 2019 03:41AM
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CA
Thanks for the great advice. Now I just need to recalibrate my torque wrench. It wsn't clicking even down to 20 ft-lbs, so had to be disassembled and reassembled. It clicks appropriately now through its range but can't be considered accurate until calibrated.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Jun 18, 2019 03:31AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Moffet
Our recently acquired 2010 Jeep Liberty has alloy wheels. Up to this point, we've only owned steel wheels, except on the Mini. As part of pre-delivery, the tire pressure sensor system was worked on and the dealer suggested we return after 80km to have the wheel nuts re-torqued. I can do that myself. 

The question is: what should be the correct procedure - just tighten to the specified 95 ft-lbs or loosen and then tighten?
(I was also surprised at the amount of torque required!)
95ft/lbs sounds right my Focus ST is 100ft/lbs it only appears to be a lot because the mini is so much less. 
Definitely use never seize on the back of them. After I torque wheels I check them after 50 miles or so but I don't loosen first,but in your situation
I think doing it over is warranted then you'll know it's done right.

 

 

 Posted: Jun 17, 2019 08:55PM
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+1 for Onetim's anti-seize.

My wife and I owned a car with steel wheels while we lived in upstate NY.  The road salt really stuck the rear wheels to the drums.  I was able to work one loose by driving short distances with the lug nuts slightly loose.  (Pounding on the tire did not work).  The other required that I cut the end off a tire iron to make a chisel and then drive the homemade chisel through the holes in the rim so I could work the wheel off.  I have used anti-seize ever since then on every car I've owned and nothing has stuck.

Doug L.
 Posted: Jun 17, 2019 04:05PM
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I would first find out what your wheels are actually torqued to. Most dealers and tire shops that i have seen just use rattle guns and way over torque the nuts constantly.

If in doubt, flat out. Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

Give a car more power and it goes faster on the straights,
make a car lighter and it's faster everywhere. Colin Chapman.

 Posted: Jun 17, 2019 07:43AM
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If you can get the wheels off, it's not a bad idea to apply some anti seize to the hub where the wheel locates. My wife had a flat, rare now, with our 13 Escape, I spent 20 minutes beating the hell out of each side of the aluminum wheel with the spare tire before it came loose. This is salty Michigan fun, but its a young mans sport I could do without. If you can't get them off, a free brake inspection or tire rotation can be a really good deal.

 Posted: Jun 17, 2019 06:02AM
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I would loosen then tighten. This way you did it to your spec. You don't know they were torqued previously.

 Posted: Jun 17, 2019 05:57AM
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CA
Our recently acquired 2010 Jeep Liberty has alloy wheels. Up to this point, we've only owned steel wheels, except on the Mini. As part of pre-delivery, the tire pressure sensor system was worked on and the dealer suggested we return after 80km to have the wheel nuts re-torqued. I can do that myself. 

The question is: what should be the correct procedure - just tighten to the specified 95 ft-lbs or loosen and then tighten?
(I was also surprised at the amount of torque required!)

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."