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 Posted: Oct 3, 2021 03:57PM
 Edited:  Oct 4, 2021 12:57PM
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Abelclasico, Thanks for bringing this up again. Besides using Fluid Film, I decided to coat the underside with an industrial epoxy paint that is used on pipelines and a complimentary epoxy top coat. I brushed this on. I then had a rattle can made up with the original paint color and sprayed the parts that show on the outer sills.

 Posted: Oct 3, 2021 08:27AM
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US
another SPAMMER!!!

 Posted: Oct 3, 2021 06:38AM
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Great way for all of you see file explorer windows 10 thanks to share me information

 Posted: Feb 4, 2021 07:33AM
 Edited:  Feb 4, 2021 07:38AM
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The VW people recommended using Masterseries rust treatment and I have to say that the results are great. After removing as much rust as you can with a wire brush, followed by Ospho or Exygone, a couple of coats of Masterseries allows for a perfect surface to be primed and painted...or left as it is.
cheers,
Abel

 Posted: Feb 3, 2021 06:27PM
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Next can I am going to try your screw-in-the-lid idea.  Sounds easy.  I will speak to the acronym development department about it.

 Posted: Jan 31, 2021 07:17PM
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I do the same with POR-15 cans. Using a big screw-in bolt, I have a can which is still good 5+years after I bought it (and I crack it open at least twice a year.) You only have to really pop those cans open if you are using a large quantity for spraying (which the vast majority of people don't do.)

Opening the lid conventionally, I never had a can last much more than a year. If I didn't seal it right, it would be cured solid in a month, and if not cleaned really well, I would have to destroy the can to open it. No such problem with the bolt.

DLY
 Posted: Jan 31, 2021 06:14PM
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I have a great POR 15 hack!!!    When using the quart cans, NEVER open them.    Instead punch a hole in the top and screw in a 5/16th lag bolt.   That way when you need to use just a little, just unscrew the bolt and use just what you need.   It's good that some of the paint gets on the threads of the bolt.    Seals it up nicely!    Been doing it this way for years.

 Posted: Jan 31, 2021 01:49PM
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You might try this trick when pouring paint out of a can. Take two lengths of painters tape and make a "V" . Make sure you catch the inner lip. Then pour. There will be no dripping in the can seal ridge, works like a charm.

 Posted: Jan 31, 2021 09:40AM
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I am using Eastwood rust products on another car in progress,  I also like their internal frame coating for hard-to-reach areas.  It comes with a spray shnozzle on the end of a 2ft long hose, the schnozzle has 5 jets so it sprays out in all directions.  I tape the tube to a piece of coat hanger, then I can fish it down inside frame rails, spraying as I slowly retract it.  Flush the tube out with Brakleen and it wont clog for your next spray.  If it does get clogged, pull a strand of wire out of an old wire brush and poke the holes clean, then Brakleen.  I was recently surprised to find a gallon of their original Rust Encapsulator that had been in a cabinet for 10 years,  opened it up, had to thin it a little but still good,  I am using that on places with surface rust that I can get to with a brush, like trunk floors and interior, coupe ceilings, under the tops of fenders.  

POR-15 is good for coating stuff that was rusted and which you have de-rusted as much as possible.  I used a lot of POR-15 on this most recent project and had trouble with their cans, if you brush paint right out of the can then some of it dries on the can lip by the time you are done painting, it sets up hard and then the lid wont seal.  So I have to pour some into a cup, clean the can lip, seal the can, paint out of the cup.  If I wont be painting again soon, now what I do is cut some plastic from a sandwich bag, place it over the open can, and shoot argon under the plastic into the can from my welder for a few seconds to displace the air, then put the lid on with the plastic under it.  That slows down its reaction with the air that got into the can.  Usually it just skins over but I let a poorly-sealed can sit for too long and the skin just kept on getting thicker and thicker,  I used a can opener and opened the can from the bottom and used up the remaining good POR-15.

I also recently tried their six pack of small cans, the little cans are sized about right for most of my jobs. https://www.tptools.com/POR-15-6-Pack-Gloss-Black-Rust-Preventive-Paint,8965.html Unfortunately only in black.  Last year I did four Mini subframes after having them blasted clean, painted them with POR-15 and I should have done them in gray because then its easy contrasting the final coat of black paint over the gray coating, when trying to paint black over black I was missing some areas.  POR-15 is affected by sunlight, you need to paint over it.  The best, glossiest flit can black paint I have ever found is for outboards and stern drives, Mercury Marine Phantom Black.  I suggest throwing away the narrow-spray nozzle that comes with it, dig through your old pile of flit can nozzles (well, I save them) and use one of those old ones that gives you the wide fan spray.

 Posted: Jan 30, 2021 05:33PM
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I don't have any experience with the products you mentioned, though I would think they would be fine especially if you can reapply them periodically.

I like this product for a lasting coating on interior channels or sections, especially those that can't be re-coated easily.

https://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-internal-frame-coating-14oz-aerosol.html

DLY
 Posted: Jan 30, 2021 03:53PM
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Saw these two products on Project Farm. I'm working on the inner and out rocker panels. After making some inner rocket patch panels, I sprayed the inner box with Fluid Film because it less likely to wash off. The other , I thought of using on the rear subframe because it is resistant to washing off. I'm welcoming comments on these products or sharing of something better. I realize that I should have been doing something better than nothing, now I'm cutting out the rust after 27 years.