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 Posted: Apr 8, 2021 11:16AM
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CA
Final (I hope) update:

Everything came apart nicely with no aggravation or damage to parts (Mini or self).
On the outer race of the inner bearing, there was a small heat mark, suggesting I caught it in good time. Similarly on the shaft of the hub there was some burnishing that looked to be about where the bearing spacer sleeve would be. The shaft and inside of the hub did not display any sign of wear.

Armed with a fresh spray can of brake-clean and a new tube of high temp wheel bearing grease, assembly began with a thorough cleaning followed by careful grease-packing of the bearing cages.
I rummaged around and found a chunk of 2"dia ABS pipe (OD 2.375") was perfect for drifting the outer bearing races into place, as well as the oil seals. One small mistake was pressing in the outer oil seal too far and having to extract it and re-insert it.

The hub assembly went back onto the suspension with no problems. For the first time I got to use my new 3/8" drive click torque wrench to put the smaller nuts and bolts (a huge bargain at $20 CDN at Princess Auto), and my much bigger 1/2" drive that I bought a couple of years ago (on sale) in anticipation of this job. I checked the calibration of the smaller wrench against my trusty beam-style torque wrench. The big one was re-calibrated after I got it.

The best part was that with the big torque wrench set for 188 foot-lbs, it clicked exactly with the hole in the shaft lining up with the castle nut. "Next time" I will try to remember to slip the hub onto the splines with the shaft hole between the wheel studs to make the cotter pin insertion easier.

Now to finish cleaning the garage floor and the work bench.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Apr 2, 2021 06:08AM
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Bikewiz: Thanks for solving the mystery of the spacer. I suppose that when hubs were assembled in the factory, they used assembling machines or jigs, so the spacer was not needed until manual replacement by guys like us. 

That nut really is the "dog's dangles"!

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Apr 2, 2021 04:01AM
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The nut that Willie-B references from Classic Minis Japan is the hot set up, you won't need to gorilla torque the nut to the next hole.

The spacer you talk about that goes behind the seal just makes seal alignment easier, I use them but my car didn't have them originally.

Boltdepot has a washer in the spec of 2" od 1" id 1/4" thick, worth it if you're buying other fasteners from them, not really worth the shipping to buy just one $2.63 washer. They carry tons of high quality fasteners in sizes for minis, so if you want high strength bolts for the suspension you could do the full monty on the front end. https://www.boltdepot.com/Product-Details.aspx?product=15904

 

 

 Posted: Apr 1, 2021 11:43AM
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Harvey: thanks again for the further tips. I'm spending the afternoon trolling for wheel bearing replacement videos. Thankfully the province-wide shutdown isn't absolute, so non-essential stores can stay open, with reduced customer capacity. That means I can shop for proper grease, I do have a tub of "Marfak" wheel bearing grease that originally belonged to my grandfather. Super stringy stuff I'd use on rear wheel bearings or trailer bearings, but they didn't have front wheel drive disk brake cars back then. OH, and the big washer looks like it should work without modification.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Apr 1, 2021 09:38AM
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Dan

quick work!

When I replaced my bearings, I also had an issue with the inner bearing outer race.
 The old one came out very easily 
 The new one dropped right in (hub on the bench) not the preferred (easy) press fit.
I just installed and used the car that way  - no  race track use

I was later told: 

(A) use race retaining compound, Loctite or other, so the outer race's  outer surface does not spin in the hub
(I figured (hoped) how could it spin if that 150+ lbs of torque was locking the ends, and there was weight on it as well) 

(B) replace the hub (the opening for the race may have stretched???)

This was 20 years ago.
No problems since. I have checked for play. None.


As for grease, I used disk brake heat range grease. (higher temp rating)

As for your other question I do not know

Harvey

 Posted: Apr 1, 2021 08:55AM
 Edited:  Apr 2, 2021 06:03AM
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Progress report:
 The Mini stared! Once I got it turned around and tucked back in to its share of the garage, I was able to remove and disassemble the hub.

It turns out the nut is 1-5/16 AND I already had that size of socket! I had bought it to remove and reinstall the big subframe bolts when replacing the suspension cones ... in 2005.

The bearings don't look too bad, though the outer race of the inner bearing shows some heat marks on the outer face where it touches the hub.

Once I got it all apart, I pulled the Haynes manual. It actually has the dimensions for the "special washer" - 2" OD x 1" ID x 1/4" thick. Rummaging around in my collection of "Stuff" I found a washer 2.25" OD x 7/8" ID x 3/16" thick. No Idea what it was for but I suppose I should check the cone compressor to make sure it does not belong to it.

New questions:
1. Haynes shows that a spacer goes between the inner oil seal and the inner bearing. The new bearing kit has one but the old, probably original bearing assembly did not have one. Am I right to assume I should put it in?

2. What grease should I use to pack the new bearings?




.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Apr 1, 2021 06:45AM
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There are these nuts available that have more slots cut for the cotter pin. I am using them on my mini.

https://classicminisjapan.com/new-parts/high-quality-twelve-slot-castle-nut/

"How can anything bigger be mini?"

 Posted: Apr 1, 2021 05:38AM
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Wow - thanks for the advice.
Nice washer! I have some flat steel I could do the same.

Off to the garage to extract the Mini!
Cheers!

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Apr 1, 2021 05:30AM
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tapered roller bearings I assume

Somebody out there must know about the flat washer size. Definitely not typical big box store size. 

I do not have a drill press but if so you could drill out a really big fender washer.

I made an ugly one a different way - see photo -
I used scrap flat steel using a drill bit to start, then an electric jig saw. Just eyeballing it, fitting it, trim off some more, real shadetree.
As seen in the photo it is so irregular it would be hard to give you an exact measure.
inner diam might be 1 inch. I just tried to measure it.

if carefully assembling (jiggling and lightly tightening up by hand first),  the flat washer procedure is not even needed. I have seen done (and done myself) the procedure without it .

Here is the way I understand it:
Preload refers to the style of the bearings. Preload is designed in. When you tighten up the castle, you are not doing anything to the rollers themselves. You are jammed tight the races that must not move.  Whatever space ("play") there is for the rollers was designed into it. Your tightening does not change that .
So "preloading" with the flat washer is a misnomer in my book. What you are doing is just snugging up everything first to be sure all is aligned and properly assembled before putting 150 lbs torque on it.

I had several years of difficult-to-diagnose problems with two rotors (including one bad out of the box)  so my bearing assembly has come off and on several times. On re-tightening, going to the next hole for the cotter is nerve-wracking. The last time I did this, I got to 150 then 200, and still no cotter alignment. Steve CTR said racer guys tighten up more anyway. Just keep going. I must have put 300 lbs on it with an extension on the handle, expecting to , gulp, break the shaft. Nope.  Again, you cannot hurt the bearing, you are just jamming the races so THEY do not move but the rollers roll. 

 Posted: Apr 1, 2021 04:04AM
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Thanks for doing the digging, Harvey.

According to my calculator, 1-5/16" = 33.3375mm, so theoretically your 1-5/16" socket would have been too tight.
Alternatively, if I bought a 34mm socket (labelled on-line as "34mm axle nut socket") it would be only slightly sloppy, about 2/3 of a mm.

Soooo close. And I'll probably use it only once!.
I guess I also need to shop for the flat washer needed to pre-load (pre-set?) the bearings.
Any idea what size that would be?

I suppose I'll have to bite the bullet and move the Mini out to where I can work on it.

Thanks,
Dan

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Mar 31, 2021 06:20PM
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Dan

 I got around to reading all the facts

there indeed is 34 mm nut for sale -
I bought one 20 ? years ago and could not use it with my 1 5/16 socket - do not recall if too loose or too tight
https://www.minimania.com/part/BTA249MS/Classic-Austin-Mini-Front-Hub-Nut-Disc-Cv-Type-1-5-16-Af-Large-Cv-Joint

no matter, minimania also has the 1 5/16 nut
https://www.minimania.com/part/BTA249/Classic-Mini-Nut-Driveshaft-Cv-Large-1-5-16-Af-Socket

for you, if original 1 5/16 nut is still there, then no problem ,the 1 5/16 socket will fit

 Posted: Mar 31, 2021 10:07AM
 Edited:  Mar 31, 2021 10:14AM
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mine is 1 5/16, not deep well

I think there are some metric castle nuts , but have no clue what year or country


https://www.minimania.com/part/BTA249MS/Classic-Austin-Mini-Front-Hub-Nut-Disc-Cv-Type-1-5-16-Af-Large-Cv-Joint

 Posted: Mar 31, 2021 08:29AM
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CA
 - 1984 Mini 8.4" disk brakes

I'm getting ready to replace a front wheel bearing but don't have a socket to remove the nut. I can't access the car right now to jack it up and remove the wheel, but can "see" the nut through the alloy wheel centre hole. It looks to be 1-3/8" or maybe 35mm.

A Covid lockdown is looming, so I want to get a socket before the stores get shut.

The question is: is it metric or imperial and what size socket to get. Also, regular dept or deep?

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."