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The goal in rebuilding an engine is to return its performance and reliability to what it once had new. The goal in “building” an engine is to increase its power within the capabilities of that engine without unduly ruining its other performance factors — drivability, mileage, reliability, and perhaps smog-law compliance. Building a performance engine is not just a matter of tossing “speed parts” like a big cam into it, nor is building high performance or racing engines anywhere near as simple as some people imagine. Change one thing and that’s a different engine. Change many things and you have entered another profession, as an engine developer. The package of professional skills you acquired as a rebuilder still apply to building high performance engines, whether for yourself or for customers. But a few advanced skills must also be acquired (or rented). So must further, up-to-date insights, for making effective decisions long before the first cutting edge touches iron. Then knowledge is power. The topic of engine performance is enormous, and enormously complicated. So one article can lead only so far. We try the possible. The May 2004 issue of Shoptalk carried my article entitled “Camshafts” that covered the basics of how engines operate across six working cycles, how cam designs affect those cycles, and some recommendations. This article looks for a moderate but real increase in power to a production engine that must run well at reasonable rpm on pump gas.
Classic Austin Mini Performance Camshaft By Elgin Various Models Available

Classic Austin Mini Performance Camshaft By Elgin Various Models Available

Classic Austin Mini Performance Camshaft By Elgin Various Models Available
Elgin full race cam for fully prepared 948cc. 13:1 compression required, dyno tune.
Elgin race cam, works best for 1275-1480cc engines.
This is a classic hot street camshaft grind from Dema Elgin, ideal for the Autocrosses or occasion track days. Best performance is achieved with a uprated cylinder head but will work great on a stock cylinder head with 1.4" intake valves. Improved RPM midrange performance will be most notable. 284/284 DURATION 235/235 DURATION @ .50 CAM LIFT .290/.290 CAM IN/EX VALVE LIFT 1.25 ROCKERS 363/393 VALVE LIFT 1.50 ROCKERS 435/435 9.5:1 COMPRESSION REQUIRED

http://www.minimania.com/article/1773/Camshaft_Theory_by_Elgin

Dema Elgin earned his reputation for high performance design and manufacture of camshaft from extensive personal racing history. This full race 306 degree duration camshaft is one of his best developed cams for the Vintage Racer that is looking for the best. The power band for this can clearly depends on compression ratio and intake/exhaust systems but is designed to work best between 4000 and 7500 RPM. It should be used with at least 13:1 compression and dyno tuned to meet your expectations. The intake valves open at 49 degrees BTDC, closes at 91 degrees ABDC, the exhaust opens at 81 degrees ATDC and closes at 49 degrees ATDC. Lobe center on this cam occurs at 106 degrees. With stock ratio rockers the valve list is .427" while with 1.5 ratio the resulting lift is .513". These cams are ground on very special cores that have been cross drilled for improved oil flow and longer life of the cam and followers both!

This camshaft has been designed by Mini Mania for use in "A" series motors that have forced induction. These motors work best with a camshaft that is optiomized for the proper overlap and timing for a 'blower' induction system. 110 degree lobe centers.
With a checking clearance of .050", the intake opens at 11 degrees BTDC and closes 51 degrees after BDC. The exhaust opens at 51 degrees before BDC and closes 11 degrees after TDC. Duration at .018 lift is 284 degrees.
Overlap is 22 degrees at .050". Duration is 242 degrees checked at .050" and/or 248 degrees at .018"
The goal in rebuilding an engine is to return its performance and reliability to what it once had new. The goal in “building” an engine is to increase its power within the capabilities of that engine without unduly ruining its other performance factors — drivability, mileage, reliability, and perhaps smog-law compliance. Building a performance engine is not just a matter of tossing “speed parts” like a big cam into it, nor is building high performance or racing engines anywhere near as simple as some people imagine. Change one thing and that’s a different engine. Change many things and you have entered another profession, as an engine developer. The package of professional skills you acquired as a rebuilder still apply to building high performance engines, whether for yourself or for customers. But a few advanced skills must also be acquired (or rented). So must further, up-to-date insights, for making effective decisions long before the first cutting edge touches iron. Then knowledge is power. The topic of engine performance is enormous, and enormously complicated. So one article can lead only so far. We try the possible. The May 2004 issue of Shoptalk carried my article entitled “Camshafts” that covered the basics of how engines operate across six working cycles, how cam designs affect those cycles, and some recommendations. This article looks for a moderate but real increase in power to a production engine that must run well at reasonable rpm on pump gas.
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Related Technical Articles:
Camshaft Theory by Elgin
Created: January 28, 2006
Considerable information has been recorded about numerous aspects of the four stroke internal combustion engine. Nevertheless, only a small percentage of people really understand how it works and even fewer still know how to modify an engine to suit their needs. I will try to simplify this complex subject by discussing some basic principles that may be overlooked or misunderstood by the average person.
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